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 An open letter John Lennon wrote to Cynthia has been unearthed after 41 years

In the original letter, which is titled 'an open letter to Cynthia Twist' and is dated November 15, 1976, the former Beatle said Cynthia had an 'impaired' memory of their marriage.

He claimed their relationship was over long before Yoko Ono arrived on the scene and accused her of double standards for wishing to get away from her past with the Beatle, yet was happy to speak about it to magazines.

Lennon sent the letter to a US weekly magazine for them to publish with the request that it is 'printed without any edits. 

I think it only fair to me and your readers to present my side of the story'.

He wrote it in response to an article Cynthia had published in an English women's magazine earlier that year.

 

Source: Express.co.uk

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The Beatles, the most popular and innovative rock group of their era — or any era — released their album Revolver 51 years ago this week. Though the album’s significance was largely overlooked at the time, the work is now widely thought of as even better than The Beatles’ acknowledged classic released a year later, Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Heart’s Club Band.

The 14-track Revolver was released in the United Kingdom on August 5, 1966, after recording sessions that lasted from April 6 to June 21 of that year. But that two and a half month period was easily eclipsed by the recording sessions for Sgt. Pepper, which began on November 24 of the same year but didn’t wrap up until April 21 of 1967. Pepper became the first Beatles album released in the United States in a version identical to its U.K. release. But when Revolver hit stores in the United States on August 8, 1966, the American version contained only 11 tracks.

Source: inquisitr.com

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Few days seem to me as compelling as those summer days when storms breed in the great sagelands to our south.

The coming of a thunderstorm creates an aura of anticipation unique among weather phenomena, a curious mixture of dread, lest the storm unleash a deadly lightning bolt, and optimism, that it might cool the fetid air and water the garden besides.

I track the cells in the most modern of ways, by checking the latest Doppler radar on my smartphone.

And yet I also brace for storms the way humans have done for millennia.

I wait. And watch. And listen.

I like nothing so much as sitting in a chair in my yard, watching the clouds clog the southern horizon, starting as individual cottony puffs that coalesce into a curtain of steel gray, like the bow of a battleship.

I’m fascinated by how the air becomes still and somehow heavy in the minutes before the storm breaks, a sort of pregnant pause when the light turns a peculiar shade of pale yellow-green and the thunder, still distant, echoes with the malevolence of an unseen artillery battle.

Source:Baker City Herald

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Bruce Sugar says when you're in the studio with Ringo, it's all about "acting naturally"

Bruce Sugar, Ringo Starr's longtime recording engineer, is very enthusiastic about the Beatle's forthcoming album, Give More Love, which will be released Sept. 15. “We're real happy with it. Everyone who's heard it can't wait till it's put out there in the universe.”

The album has 10 main tracks and four additional bonus tracks that are new versions of old Ringo songs, including a version of “Back Off Boogaloo” that was assembled from an old recently rediscovered tape. And as always, the album has an assortment of distinguished names playing on various tracks, including fellow Beatle Paul McCartney, Ringo's brother-in-law Joe Walsh, Edgar Winter, Peter Frampton, Nathan East, Don Was, Jeff Lynne, Timothy B. Schmit, and current Ringo All-Starrs Steve Lukather, Richard Page, Gregg Bissonette, among others, along with Sugar himself. He says the plans for the new album started coming together just after his last one, Postcards From Paradise, was released.

Source: Steve Marinucci

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A gay Jewish man living in 1960s England, Brian Epstein was a double outsider, all the more out of place with his natty attire and crisp diction as he ran his record store and sought affection in dangerous, degrading ways. But in November 1961, he gazed, mesmerized, upon four pumped-up boys in leather jackets and jeans driving crowds wild at Liverpool’s Cavern Club. He was particularly captivated by one: John Winston Lennon. Epstein soon became the band’s manager, in possibly the most auspicious match in rock history.

The predominant narrative of Beatles history gives insufficient credit to the role Epstein played in shaping the group’s image and preparing them for international adulation. He dressed them in tailored suits (better for attracting the girls); shopped their records to label after label, armed with little but his name and his unyielding faith; fostered their songwriting; and encouraged the musicians’ penchant for goofy wordplay in press interviews while urging sophistication.

Source: Joseph McCombs 

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Yoko Ono and Sean Lennon Interview - Tuesday, August 01, 2017

Sean Lennon is talking about his mother’s child-rearing philosophy. “She had a very sort of postmodern, post-hippie, post-feminist way of thinking,” he says of Yoko Ono.“ It was very liberal, and she always treated me like an individual. She never really told me not to do anything, except get a Mohawk or a tattoo. So there were very few boundaries. She believed that kids are individuals and shouldn’t be treated like a subservient class.”

At 84, Ono—singer, artist, activist, and guardian of the legacy of her late husband (and Sean’s father), John Lennon—is enjoying a remarkable late-career reappraisal. The Ono oeuvre, once maligned as a conglomeration of unbearable neo-Dadaist pranks and unlistenable music, is now considered haute. Her conceptual-art projects—films, installations, happenings, and performance pieces, such as her 1964 work Cut Piece, in which she invited viewers to cutoff swaths of her clothing with a pair of scissors—today are seen as groundbreaking. Her albums and recordings, which mostly eschewed melody and traditional song structure, are held up as revolutionary. Even her clipped aphoristic “instructions,” famously compiled i details

Paul McCartney may have something to say about Donald Trump on his forthcoming untitled album, according to the Liverpool Echo.

During a visit to students at the Liverpool Institute of Performing Arts last week, the paper reports that McCartney told the students, “Sometimes the situation in the world is so crazy, that you’ve got to address it." The Liverpool Echo says the song he's written will pertain to President Trump. Billboard reached out to McCartney's reps for details.

McCartney is a co-founder of the institute, also called LIPA, and was a student there when it was known as Liverpool Institute High School For Boys. The high school closed in 1985 and reopened as LIPA after an extensive renovation. McCartney is the school's Lead Patron.

He didn't elaborate further on the song according to the report, but given some other recent comments he has made, Trump and his followers probably won't be a fan of the song.

In an interview with the Australian newspaper the Daily Telegraph published at the beginning of July, he told writer Cameron Adams, “I'm not a fan at all. He’s unleashed a kind of violent prejudice that is sometimes latent among people," he said.

Source: details

n all-new Beatles documentary, It Was Fifty Years Ago Today! The Beatles: Sgt. Pepper & Beyond, is being released in the U.S. on September 8 on DVD, Blu-ray and VOD, by BFD distributed by The Orchard.

The film is director by Alan G. Parker, the director of Monty Python: Almost The Truth, Rebel Truce: The Story of The Clash, Never Mind the Sex Pistols, and Who Killed Nancy, among many others.

The film features rare archival footage unseen since the 1960s plus rare interviews with the Beatles’ original drummer Pete Best, John Lennon’s sister Julia Baird, Beatles’ manager Brian Epstein’s secretary Barbara O’Donnell, Beatles associate Tony Bramwell, Pattie Boyd’s sister Jenny Boyd, Beatles author Philip Norman, and more.


Source: Best Classic Bands

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In India, when we say "the wall" in public discourse, we generally refer to former Indian cricket captain Rahul Dravid for his impenetrable batting. But in Prague, the wall makes John Lennon, the famous English singer-songwriter-activist, relevant in a conversation. And like the Indian wall, the Prague wall also stands impenetrable, in terms of spirit for freedom.

Although Lennon, who lived on this planet for just 40 autumns, did not ever visit the capital of the Czech Republic, his name is taken every moment in the picturesque city, courtesy the wall. And when I witnessed it, the feeling was, to say the least, exciting. For a first-timer in the historic city of Prague, it was equivalent to witnessing history from close quarters.

The special wall, known as the John Lennon Wall, is located Velkopřevorské náměstí in Mala Strana, which is not far from the French Embassy in Prague. Once an ordinary wall, it came to be associated with Lennon since the 1980s when people started treating it as a symbol of liberty by painting it with graffiti inspired by the iconic singer and lyrics from the unforgettable Beatles.

But why the wall was chosen as a platform to express liberty?

Lennon w details

Apple Corps, the company founded by members of The Beatles, on Wednesday won the dismissal of a lawsuit seeking the rights to the master tapes of the band's celebrated 1965 concert at New York's Shea Stadium.

U.S. District Judge George Daniels in Manhattan said Sid Bernstein Presents LLC, named for the concert's promoter, failed to show it deserved sole control over the Aug. 15, 1965, footage and deserved damages reflecting its many subsequent uses.

Daniels said the company, which said it had been assigned Bernstein's rights, could not claim to be the "author" of a copyrightable work even if Bernstein were the driving force behind the sold-out concert because he did not film it.

"The relevant legal question is not the extent to which Bernstein contributed to or financed the 1965 concert; rather, it is the extent to which he 'provided the impetus for' and invested in a copyrightable work - e.g., the concert film," Daniels wrote. "The complaint and relevant contracts clearly refute any such claim by Bernstein."

 

Source:Reuters

 

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When George Harrison stopped by to plug a new project for his old friend Ravi Shankar on July 24, 1997, it was almost as if he somehow knew this would be his last TV appearance. Sparked by an intuitive line of questioning by VH1’s John Fugelsang, Harrison turned expansive on his faith and what happens when we die.

Most of that, as you’d expect, was initially left on the cutting-room floor, as VH1 chose to focus instead on the musical portion of their conversation. Harrison was diagnosed with throat cancer later that year, and during the period before he died, the network reedited the former Beatles star’s segment to include his meditation on death.

VH1 then aired the expanded version on the day Harrison died, finally giving full voice to a remarkably deep conversation on the nature of death and salvation. Song performances included “Any Road,” a previously unheard number that later appeared on 2002’s Brainwashed; “If You Belonged to Me,” from the Traveling Wilburys‘ 1990 album, Vol. 3; and, most touchingly, the title track from All Things Must Pass.

How Harrison got there was pure happenstance. When he showed up unannounced with Shankar, he agreed to details

The debate over marijuana legalization doesn’t seem likely to end anytime soon, but if and when it’s ever decriminalized, enthusiasts should toke up in honor of the Beatles, who publicly came out in favor of it 50 years ago.

As noted by the Beatles Bible, the band members and manager Brian Epstein were all among the signatories when 64 of Britain’s best and brightest were rounded up to urge discussion of the issue by taking out a full-page ad in the London Times on July 24, 1967. Prompted by the arrest of acclaimed photographer and International Times founder John Hopkins — and his subsequent nine-month sentencing for possession — the group sought to call attention to what they deemed an unnecessarily harsh public policy.

Arguing that marijuana is “the least harmful of pleasure-giving drugs, and … in particular, far less harmful than alcohol,” the ad added, “Cannabis smoking is widespread in the universities, and the custom has been taken up by writers, teachers, doctors, businessmen, musicians, scientists and priests. Such persons do not fit the stereotype of the unemployed criminal dope fiend.”

Although none of the Beatles were in attendance details

 

In The Beatles’ 1966 song Taxman, George Harrison berates Harold Wilson’s proposed 95pc “supertax” on the UK’s highest earners. “If 5pc appears too small,” he sings bitterly, “be grateful I don’t take it all.”

But there was one man to whom the Fab Four were genuinely thankful for keeping their Revenue bill down: their accountant, Harry Pinsker.

Many people claim to have been in The Beatles’ inner circle, but Pinsker truly was. From 1961 to 1970 he oversaw their finances, set up their companies, helped buy their homes, and even signed off their grocery shopping.

“I first met them in my office – they were just four scruffy boys,” recalls Pinsker, now 87. “I hadn’t heard of them – few people had outside Liverpool. That changed.”

Pinsker was born in Hackney, east London, and harboured ambitions to be a doctor or solicitor. But he lost months of education through war (he was evacuated to Norfolk and Cornwall), racism (Truro College said it “could not take a Jewish boy”) and illness (he spent days in intensive care with peritonitis).

“Missing schooling mea details

This is a bit of a tough question as all four of them were in the great Beatles movies “A Hard Day’s Night,” “Help!” and “Yellow Submarine,” and their songs have been used to great effect in countless films. Each of them is an Oscar-winner, having nabbed the award for best original score (for a musical film) for the 1970 documentary “Let it Be.”

But individually, each Beatle’s film work has run the gamut in quality/quantity.

John Lennon

Before his death in 1980, Lennon had acted in very few films. His key role outside of the Beatles films was in 1967’s “How I Won the War,” which reunited Lennon with Richard Lester, director of “A Hard Day’s Night.” In the WWII comedy, Lennon plays an enlisted man who falls victim to the pratfalls of his hapless commander.

Though little came of his acting career, Lennon has 840 movie/TV soundtrack credits to his name, more than any other Beatle.

Source: Micah Mertes / World-Herald staff writer - Omaha.com

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If you looked at the music sales charts this year and saw the Beatles’ masterpiece “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” perched in the top spot, you weren’t having a flashback to 1967 and the Summer of Love, when the album was first released. Yes, the Beatles got back this year, and you’ll get no argument from Geoff Emerick, the Grammy-winning engineer of that landmark album, that it’s absolutely where they once belonged. Emerick began his career as a teenager in 1962 for EMI in London, where he assisted the production of the Beatles’ recordings, including their first hit, “Love Me Do.” Over the years Emerick has twirled the knobs for a dazzling array of music greats, including Kate Bush, the solo Paul McCartney, Supertramp, Elvis Costello and another Brit sonic masterpiece, the Zombies’ “Time of the Season.” But his first time in Variety was tied to his Grammy win for “Sgt. Pepper” in 1968.

By the time “Sgt. Pepper” arrived, you’d already logged many hours with the Beatles at Abbey Road.

I was dropped into the deep end of the pond. I was mastering American records for the U.K. market one day, and the n details

By any measure, Paul McCartney is the most successful musician of all time.

With his bands and his solo career, Sir Paul has sold more albums than anyone. McCartney is among the top Grammy winners, and he has dozens of platinum albums.

Of course it helps that he was part of the Beatles.

With 178 million albums sold, the Fab Four are the top-selling artist of all time in the U.S. The group had 43 platinum certifications, 26 multiplatinum and six diamond.

But McCartney’s solo work and his material with Wings have kept him in the spotlight, selling albums and winning more awards since the Beatles’ breakup. And McCartney’s tours have ranked among the top 15 worldwide for the last six years.

We took a look at McCartney and the Beatles statistics, and, in some cases, checked to see how he and they compare with other major musicians. See the stats below.

Credit where credit’s due

Some might say McCartney deserves only ¼ of the credit for his time in the Beatles.

I say no.

He should get full credit.

 

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A Dallas-based auction announced plans to sell what's said to be the first recording contract signed by the Beatles. It is expected to sell for $150,000, as part of a larger collection to be sold on September 19. (Aug. 21) AP

“Revolver” probably would have been a very different album without drugs and Indian music.

The former inspired much of John Lennon’s inventiveness, which paved the way for the legendary “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” the following year. And the latter heavily influenced George Harrison’s songwriting and musicianship as he contributed three of his own songs.Revolver" by The Beatles. (Photo: Submitted)

Released on Aug. 5, 1966, in the United Kingdom, the album directly preceded the band’s final concert on Aug. 29, 1966, in front of 25,000 people at Candlestick Park in San Francisco.

“Musically, I felt we were progressing in leaps and bounds.”
— Ringo Starr, The Beatles

During the recording process the band spent about 300 hours in the studio, where producer George Martin said their ideas were beginning to become “much more potent,” according to TheBealtes.com. Ringo also recogni details

Famed British performer Paul McCartney plans to return to the Iowa Events Center this summer for a one-night only concert, his second ever in Des Moines.

In case you didn't already know: Paul McCartney is performing in Des Moines on Friday, as part of his “One on One" summer tour.

So it's only fitting that July 21, 2017, is declared "Paul McCartney Day" in Polk County.

Polk County Auditor Jamie Fitzgerald tweeted a photo of the proclamation at the Board of Supervisors meeting Tuesday morning.

McCartney, 75, is a storied songwriter and famed member of The Beatles. He is an 18-time Grammy Award winner and has sold an estimated 700 million records worldwide with The Beatles, Wings and through solo efforts.

Friday will be McCartney's third performance in Iowa. He first performed in 1990 at Jack Trice Stadium in Ames and again in 2005 at Wells Fargo Arena.

Source: Des Moine Register

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Ringo Starr has just turned 77. It's a few days after his celebrity-packed “Peace and Love”-themed birthday bash at Capitol Records in L.A., and he’s holding forth inside a Beverly Hills hotel on a warm summer afternoon. Among other things, about how he almost ended up decamping to Nashville last year with his pal and former Eurythmics guitarist Dave Stewart to make a country album. And about living in Los Angeles, where he first bought a house back in 1976 (“I love America,” he tells Billboard, “but I love L.A.”). He's even talking about those long strings of emojis he tacks on to the ends of his tweets -- which, by the way, he posts himself.

At some point during the conversation, you find yourself wondering whether it’ll always be like this. That one of the most famous drummers in rock music will remain the act you’ve known for all these years and keep this up well into his eighth decade. And why shouldn't he?

Ringo Starr may get old, but as far as he's concerned, being Ringo never does.

“I love joy,” he says. “I love the light. I’m still doing what was my dream at 13, and that’s playing. I think that help details

Sir Paul rocks Bossier - Story - Monday, July 17, 2017

BOSSIER CITY, La. - The parking lots, as well as grassy area across the street from CenturyLink arena in Bossier City began filling up with cars with license plates from surrounding states early Saturday afternoon, as former Beatles and Wings member-turned-solo artist Paul McCartney kicked off his United States tour Saturday.

When the doors opened at 6:30 p.m., people began flowing into the arena, which was filled to capacity before the official 8 p.m. start time.

But when Sir Paul and his band bounded up the steps to the stage around 25 minutes late, no one seemed to care, as the 75-year-old rocker immediately got the huge crowd on their feet with an elaborate, yet pure, rendition of the Beatles classic 1964 hit, “Hard Days Night.”

Throughout the evening, McCartney interspersed early Beatles tunes with those from his years with Wings, and many in the audience never sat down during the almost three-hour concert…singing along with many of the songs.

Though many people in the audience clearly remembered the Beatles early days, some only remembered Wings, the band McCartney and his late wife Linda formed after he left the Beatles in 1970.

And others, obviously grandchildre details

For a knighted pop singer with a career stretching nearly 60 years, Paul McCartney seems like such a normal person.

The most scandalous thing I could find on TMZ was a video of him getting rejected alongside Beck at the doors of a club.

I read his latest interview with Rolling Stone and couldn't help but notice how cooly the 75-year-old performer dissected The Beatles' legacy.

“We always tried to be the best band in Liverpool,” McCartney told the magazine. “Then we tried to be the best band in England. Then we tried to be the best in the world.”

There's only a handful of musicians who could say something like that without appearing arrogant. McCartney's reflection on his mop-topped phase sounds so matter of fact, and there was very little precedent for what The Beatles did in their touring years. Those suits, songs and the resulting screams are the building blocks of arena tours and today's high-profile music entertainment.

The newest leg of the "One On One" tour lands in Oklahoma City on Monday and marks Sir Paul's return to the Chesapeake Energy Arena roughly 15 years after he helped open the downtown venue. He'll play nearly 40 songs over the course of three hou details

The nominations for the 69th annual Emmy Awards were announced this morning, and the Ron Howard-directed rock doc The Beatles: Eight Days a Week — The Touring Years came away with a fab five nods, including Outstanding Documentary or Nonfiction Special.

The film, which got its TV premiere on Hulu in September, will also compete for Emmys in four other Nonfiction Program categories: outstanding writing, picture editing, sound editing and sound mixing.

Eight Days a Week — The Touring Years takes an in-depth look at the Fab Four’s history from 1962 to 1966, while showcasing the band’s live performances. Those span from their historic early hometown gigs at the Cavern Club in Liverpool through their final official concert at Candlestick Park in San Francisco.

The movie, which features rare and previously unseen footage of The Beatles, was produced with the full cooperation of surviving members Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr, and from the widows of John Lennon and George Harrison: Yoko Ono and Olivia Harrison.

 

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THE hotel where The Beatles stayed during their 1964 tour of Scotland has been snapped up by a new owner.Guests can stay in the chalet where John Lennon and Paul McCartney spent the night at The Four Seasons at St Fillans in Perthshire after the 19th century boutique hotel was bought by businesswoman Susan Stuart in a £795,000 takeover deal. Ms Stuart can already stake her own claim to fame, having launched the legendary Roundhouse venue – a former railway engine shed converted into a performing arts and concert venue in London.

She moved to Perthshire for a change of scenery and chose the Four Seasons because of its setting and history.The Fab Four arrived at the hotel during a night of heavy rain on October 19, 1964.Fresh from another wild show in Edinburgh’s ABC Cinema, the travel-weary Liverpudlians were ushered into the dining room for steaks.

 

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John Lennon's psychedelic Rolls-Royce returns to Britain to mark the launch of its new Phantom and 50 years of Sgt Peppers

It will travel from Canada to London to join ‘The Great Eight Phantoms’ – A Rolls-Royce Exhibition, at Bonhams on Bond Street, an area visited regularly by Lennon in the late 1960s in this very car.

Members of the public will be able to see it there from 29 July to the 2 August.

Lennon took delivery of his car on on 3 June 1965 – the same day that astronaut Edward H White left the capsule of his Gemini 4 to become the first American to walk in space.

Originally the Rolls-Royce Phantom V was in Valentine Black. But Lennon had it customised in true rock-star style.

The rear seat was converted to a double bed, and a television, telephone and refrigerator were installed, along with a 'floating' record player and a custom sound system (which included an external loud hailer).

Then, in April 1967, just as the recording of the ground-breaking Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band album was finishing, Lennon asked Surrey-based coachbuilders JP Fallon to give the Phantom a new paint job which was carried out by local artist Steve Weaver, w details

- He saw her standing there and pulled her up on stage. A Polk County woman got a surprise chance to sing with music legend Paul McCartney Monday night, and there's no maybe about it: She's amazed.

The former Beatle played some of the greatest hits from the Fab Four and also from his solo career during a rocking show at Amalie Arena in Tampa.

Kecia Howell and her son were pulled up on stage to sing ‘Get Back’ with McCartney.  She was wearing a handmade Sergeant Pepper-style jacket and sitting up in the front, so they're thinking that's why he may have noticed her.Not only did she get to sing and dance on stage with Sir Paul, she also got something that would be the envy of pretty much any fan -- a smooc details

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