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If you wanted obscure lyrics, the 1967 work of John Lennon will do. Start with the “looking-glass ties” and “marmalade skies” on “Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds.” As John said of a different Beatles song from that year, “Stick a few images together, thread them together, and you call it poetry.”

He was speaking about “I Am the Walrus,” a track that took obscure lyrics to another level. Yet on tracks like “All You Need Is Love,” his message couldn’t be clearer. A few years later, John was singing in the most direct way possible on “Don’t Let Me Down” and “I Want You.”

On his first solo album (1970), he dispensed with images entirely, and fans got more of the same on 1971’s Imagine. (“The only thing you done was ‘Yesterday,'” he sang of Paul McCartney.) But Mind Games (1973) found John back to writing at least somewhat obscurely.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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In the autumn months of 1969, Paul McCartney died.

It had been a series of deaths, really. First up were the rumors, invented and spread by DJs and college students, that he had perished in a 1966, automobile accident and that the other Beatles were accomplices in the coverup. The Paul Is Dead hoax would be quelled after Life magazine dispatched a crew to Scotland to track down McCartney. The world breathed a sigh of relief after Life ran a November cover story under the banner headline "Paul Is Still with Us" and a glossy photo of the living, breathing Beatle with his young family.

But during that same period, he had also suffered a spiritual death of sorts with the Beatles' disbandment. For McCartney, the idea of no longer being in the group meant that his creative outlet had seemingly been extinguished. By his reasoning, the "overall feeling" during his downtrodden days in Scotland was that "it was good while I was in the Beatles, I was useful, and I could play bass for their songs, I could write songs for them to sing and for me to sing, and we could make records of them. But the minute I wasn't with the Beatles anymore, it became really very difficult."

Source: salon.com

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KARW was a radio station in Tyler-Longview, Texas. The station broadcasted at 1280 kHz AM for 46 years, ending in 1994. In 1966, the “Beatles Bonfire” was an event that was both retrospectively comical, or extremely disrespectful, depending on how religious or into the Beatles you claim to be.It all started in the fall of 1996. The culprit? John Lennon. It was all due to an offhanded comment in an interview with Maureen Cleave with the London Evening Standard. In the interview in early August, John Lennon stated that his band, The Beatles, was more popular than Jesus Christ. Which, depending on who you ask, the fab four just might have been. Women were screaming, swooning, and passing out at shows, Beatles albums were being printed and sold at lightning speeds, and rock and roll was being changed forever. The comment was printed in Datebook, an American teen magazine and that’s when all hell broke loose. Because the only thing that can rival Jesus’ fandom is a boyband. Most people read the article and just dismissed it as pop music babble.

Source:  Moriah Gill, Writer/rare.us

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here were five months between the announcement and the release of Green Day’s new album, Father of All…, and even though it’s the band’s 13th studio LP, frontman Billie Joe Armstrong admits he still gets nervous with anticipation.

“I have a hard time sleeping and I try to distract myself as much as I can,” he told DK of ALT 105.3 in San Francisco.

There was nothing to worry about, of course, now that we know that the concise 10-song, 26-minute ‘60s pop-inspired album to be another win for Green Day.

But a social media question from a listener brought Billie Joe back to another moment when he had to catch his breath. A fan wanted to know the last person to make him starstruck. The year was 2015 and it involved the surviving Beatles.

“When we got inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame and Ringo (Starr) was doing a sound check and we’re standing next to Paul McCartney’s bass amp and he was relearning how to play the bassline to ‘(With) a Little Help From My Friends,’” Armstrong recalled. “And I just sort of looked over at Mike (Dirnt) and I was like ‘I can’t even believe what is happening right n details

When Beatles manager Brian Epstein secured the Fab Four’s spot on the 1967 Our World broadcast, he considered it a major coup for his group. “I have the most fantastic news to report,” Epstein told the band before making his announcement. But none of The Beatles seemed to care.

At the time, the group was finishing up Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band and couldn’t be bothered. Though Our World eventually reached hundreds of millions via satellite, it appeared to be just another appearance to four guys who’d made it their mission to stop touring a year earlier.

Nonetheless, John Lennon volunteered to write a song for the broadcast, which would feature the band performing live in Abbey Road studios. And, as they’d done when recording the orchestra part for “A Day in the Life,” The Beatles decided to make it a happening.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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Lennon was officially still a Beatles member when he performed his hit single on BBC.

In 1970 John Lennon becomes the first solo Beatle to appear on Top Of The Pops when he performs his single “Instant Karma!”

Released while John Lennon was still officially a member of The Beatles, on February 6, 1970, “Instant Karma!” was written, recorded and released within a period of ten days, making it one of the fastest-released songs in pop music history. The recording was produced by Phil Spector, marking a comeback for the American producer after his self-imposed retirement in 1966, and leading to him being offered the producer’s role on the 1970 Beatles’ “Let It Be” album. Having privately announced his departure from The Beatles in September 1969, he was now comfortable to issue “Instant Karma!” immediately as a single, the third under his and Ono’s Plastic Ono Band moniker.

Source: popexpresso.com

 

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The contribution to music from John Lennon and Paul McCartney can never be truly overstated. The partnership spawned some of the world’s most cherished songs and later emboldened the pair to seek solo careers. But what was the final song the pair truly wrote alongside one another?

‘Lennon & McCartney’ is a marking so ubiquitous on the back of The Beatles’ first records that you would expect the Fab Four to be a duo. While George Harrison and Ringo Starr’s own proficiency with a pen grew with time, for a short while all the songs were either Paul’s or John’s.

During the band’s frenzied early moments, attached to one another by the almighty touring schedule, Lennon and McCartney created songs side by side. They worked on melodies together, they exchanged lyrical ideas, they harmonised on vocals and either played piano or guitar for one another. But soon enough that naturally came to an end.

Source: faroutmagazine.co.uk

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Solid State: The Story of Abbey Road and the End of the Beatles, the new work by Kenneth Womack, dean of humanities and social sciences at Monmouth University, and veteran Beatles historian, is essentially two books. The first half is a fascinating look at the Fab Four’s swan song, whether you’re a general Beatles fan, a musician, someone fascinated by the record production process, or all of the above. The second half is a much darker look at the world’s most influential musical act of the 1960s imploding. While Beatles obsessives like myself know the tale of how Abbey Road was written and produced fairly well, Womack manages to uncover several surprising details.

Source: By Ed Driscoll /pjmedia.com

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What John Lennon Hated About the British Press - Wednesday, February 12, 2020

Imagine, if you can, a storied British institution under siege. After years of joy and prosperity, the institution faces a challenge from an outsider — a foreigner — with the potential to topple the colossus.

That might sound like the saga of Meghan Markle and Prince Harry in recent years, but it’s only the latest example. Fifty years earlier, John Lennon and his soon-to-be wife Yoko Ono dealt with a similar reaction from the British tabloid press during the latter days of The Beatles.

After a couple years of that treatment, John and Yoko did what they had to do — they left England for good. If you read what John said about the British press, it isn’t hard to see how he came to that decision.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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Bob Dylan. The Cure. Alice Cooper. Roger Daltrey. Brian Wilson. Def Leppard, Dr John. Kiss. Chrissie Hynde. Jeff Lynne. Heart. Steve Miller. Perry Farrell. Robin Zander & Rick Nielsen. Sammy Hagar. Paul Rodgers.

There are tribute albums and then there are tribute albums. The Art Of McCartney, a tribute to former Beatle Paul McCartney, is one of the latter, with a cast of performers that reads like a "who's who" of A-list rock stardom.

Launched in 2014, the super-deluxe version of the album (triple CD, quadruple coloured vinyl, DVD, 64-page 12” hardback book, etc) originally retailed at £240, but right now it's on sale for less than £90 at Amazon.

Source: By Scott Munro/loudersound.com

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There are a few jams in the history of Rock and Roll Hall of Fame performances which will live long in the memory for the musicians who share the stage. But surely there’s no bigger performance than this jam session on ‘I Saw Her Standing There’ featuring George Harrison, Bob Dylan, Mick Jagger and a plethora of stars all take the stage.

There have been some incredible moments in Rock Hall’s long history, but none rank as highly as the institution’s third-ever event. That night saw The Beatles, The Beach Boys, Bob Dylan, and the Drifters all be inducted into the quickly filling mantle of music.

While The Beatles were being inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1988, not all the surviving members of the iconic band would attend the event. George Harrison and Ringo Starr would arrive at the show without Paul McCartney. The singer boycotted the event as the result of ongoing business disputes.

Source: faroutmagazine.co.uk

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With the Beatles - Monday, February 10, 2020

What I find strange about growing old isn’t that I’ve got older. Not that the youthful me from the past has, without my realizing it, aged. What catches me off guard is, rather, how people from the same generation as me have become elderly, how all the pretty, vivacious girls I used to know are now old enough to have a couple of grandkids. It’s a little disconcerting—sad, even. Though I never feel sad at the fact that I have similarly aged.

I think what makes me feel sad about the girls I knew growing old is that it forces me to admit, all over again, that my youthful dreams are gone forever. The death of a dream can be, in a way, sadder than that of a living being.

There’s one girl—a woman who used to be a girl, I mean—whom I remember well. I don’t know her name, though. And, naturally, I don’t know where she is now or what she’s doing. What I do know about her is that she went to the same high school as I did, and was in the same year (since the badge on her shirt was the same color as mine), and that she really liked the Beatles.

Source: Haruki Murakami/newyorker.com

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55 years ago - The Beatles on Ed Sullivan - Sunday, February 09, 2020

It was 56 years ago; nearly 73 million people were watching when “The Ed Sullivan Show” went on the air and The Beatles took over music forever.

John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr, fresh from Liverpool, England, kicked off the first of three Sunday appearances on the variety on Feb. 9, 1964.

A screaming crowd and national television audience watched that first show, and the yelling did not subside as the quartet sang five songs over two sets.

Here are five fun facts about that smashing debut:

Source: Dayton Daily News

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‘Here Comes the Sun’, the iconic song most synonymous with guitarist George Harrison, featured on The Beatles 1969 album Abbey Road and is remembered as one of the band’s biggest hits.

Harrison, who wrote the song in early 1969 while staying at the country house of his friend Eric Clapton, was enduring a difficult period of his life when he created the track having recently quit The Beatles and had been arrested for marijuana possession.

“‘Here Comes the Sun’ was written at the time when Apple was getting like school, where we had to go and be businessmen: ‘Sign this’ and ‘sign that’,” Harrison later wrote in his autobiography. “Anyway, it seems as if winter in England goes on forever, by the time spring comes you really deserve it. So one day I decided I was going to sag off Apple and I went over to Eric Clapton’s house.”

Source: Lee Thomas-Mason/faroutmagazine.co.uk

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In the mid-’60s, George Harrison’s explorations into Indian music had a marked impact on the sound of The Beatles. From the opening notes of “Norwegian Wood” to the very Eastern “Within You Without You,” George’s use of the sitar and tambura made the Fab Four a more interesting band.

But that shift in focus had its side effects. The time George spent learning the sitar took time away from his guitar playing beginning in 1965. Looking back in ’77, he said he barely played the guitar for about three years.

During that stretch, George had to look on as Paul McCartney grabbed the solo on “Taxman” (a song George wrote in ’66) and “Good Morning, Good Morning” (’67). But after his return from India in ’68, George once again focused on the guitar.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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Despite the millions she earned as one of Britain’s top entertainers, Cilla Black and her husband Bobby Willis hated throwing stuff away. 

Huge plastic containers in which the food for their five dogs was delivered were reused as storage boxes. 

Supermarket plastic bags were filled with tapes of original music recordings, and some of these were even found stuffed inside a 1970s fondue set in the larder. 

Piles and piles of photos and videos were stashed in black bin liners and left to gather dust in the attic, alongside boxes of Star Wars toys and Beano comics.

Source: Nicole Lampert/dailymail.co.uk

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Beatles For Sale - Friday, February 07, 2020

It’s impossible to wrap your head around quite how busy The Beatles were during the first few months of 1964.

After kicking off the year with a marathon 18-day residency in Paris - two shows a night, mind you - they re-recorded their hits in German (“Sie liebt dich, ja ja ja!”), played the Ed Sullivan show - twice! - made a classic movie, and a classic album, published John Lennon’s book of nonsense verse, hobnobbed with Muhammad Ali, and crisscrossed the globe from Blackpool to Hong Kong to Adelaide to San Francisco.

Nevertheless, as summer turned to autumn the Fab Four were told, basically, ‘pull your fingers out, lads, there’s wedge to be made.’ And so they slunk back to the studio and cracked on with their second album of the year. Their fourth, by the way, in the space of just 21 months.

Source: ClashMusic

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If you ever watch the Super Bowl halftime show, you know how much lip-snyching takes away from the performance. However, with hundreds of millions of people watching around the globe, some performers don’t want to take the chance they’ll mess up.

When The Beatles agreed to perform “All You Need Is Love” for the first global broadcast transmitted around the world, John Lennon seemed to realize that singing it live was the only way to go. Behind the scenes, the band’s production team at Abbey Road thought it was a bad idea.

“Miming to a prerecorded track was the safest course of action,” engineer Geoff Emerick wrote in Here, There and Everywhere. Emerick described Lennon’s plan to sing live as “a foolhardy — though brave — decision.” Producer George Martin agreed the Fab Four should tape everything.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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“I was worried that there were not enough people who knew about us,” says Jeff Lynne, who expresses his concern about revitalizing ELO at a headline festival at Hyde Park in London in September 2014.

“We took a great opportunity. The public could go home any time, they didn’t have to wait for us at the end. But it was still full. I remember looking through a small hole in the curtain and saying, “They’re still here!”

Of course they were. The festival was sold out and moved the full quota of 50,000 tickets in just fifteen minutes. It seems ridiculous that one of the most bankable stars ever doubted that he still had an audience. But then Jeff Lynne is not your typical rock star.

Modest and self-coding, it is difficult to compare the softly spoken 71-year-old – his Brummie accent intact despite living in Los Angeles for many years – with his status as head of ELO, with record sales of over 50 million and counts. Indeed, from 1972 until their original dissolution in 1986, ELO scored more transatlantic Top 40 hits than any other band in the world.

Source: Paula Griffin/gotechdaily.com

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You never knew where a John Lennon lyric might take you. Even in the early, simple days of The Beatles, John could threaten a lover that he’d “let you down and leave you flat” for disappointing him.

Within a few years, John would take listeners upstream on psychedelic journeys (“Tomorrow Never Knows”) or paint “like a watercolor” (“Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite“). By the mid-’60s, John had become a master of lyric-writing.

With “I Am the Walrus” (1967) and his White Album (1968) tracks, he stretched the bounds of Beatles lyrics further. In ’69, while recording music for Let It Be and Abbey Road, John took a turn back toward raw, simple lyrics.

After “Don’t Let Me Down” (the B-side to “Get Back”), John went even simpler and rawer with “I Want You (She’s So Heavy).” In fact, you’ll only find a total of 15 different words when you check the lyrics.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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Beatles tribute band coming to Egyptian Theatre - Wednesday, February 05, 2020

The end of The Beatles came in 1970 when Paul McCartney announced he was leaving the group, but 50 years later the music of The Beatles lives on and will be performed by The Return, an American Beatles tribute band. The show will be 7:30 p.m. Friday at the Egyptian Theatre, 135 N. Second St.

Founded in 1995, The Return is a tribute to the Fab Four and stars Georgia natives Richard Stelling, Shane Landers, Michael Fulop and Adam Thurston as John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr, respectively. For the first half of the two-hour performance, the band will be dressed in 1964 “A Hard Day’s Night” themed costumes and will perform early hits from the touring years of 1963 to 1966, Fulop said.

This will include hits like “I Want To Hold Your Hand” and “A Hard Day’s Night,” as well as songs that influenced The Beatles such as “Twist and Shout” by The Top Notes and “Roll Over Beethoven” by Chuck Berry, according to The Return website.

Source: Parker Otto/northernstar.info

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This year marks the 50th anniversary of the release of “Let It Be” and the official end of The Beatles when Paul McCartney publicly announced he was leaving the band in April of 1970. All throughout the 2010s, Beatle fans saw deluxe remasters of their favorite albums, from 2017’s “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” to “Abbey Road” in 2019. Not only was every song remastered, but demos, outtakes and alternate versions of the classic Beatles’ tunes were also included.

These remastered albums prove The Beatles’s music today is as relevant as it was from 1962-1969. In the 1960s, the group’s songs were about peace and love, while the civil rights movement, war and a generation gap were the new norm in the United States and in the world. Today’s world is still plagued with issues, including tensions between the U.S. and Iran, climate related crises around the world and terrorist attacks.

Source: Stephen C. Leverton II/theappalachianonline.com

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While John Lennon was never did a lot of bragging about his Beatles-era guitar playing, he did take pride in his innovations in the studio. That included the backwards vocals on “Rain” as well as the work with tape loops he did on “Revolution 9.”

But an even bigger point of pride for John revolved around his use of feedback. During the October 1964 sessions for Beatles for Sale, John pushed to get the sound of his guitar/amplifier feedback on record. Producer George Martin agreed, and John considered it a major accomplishment.

“The record with the first feedback anywhere,” John said in his 1980 Playboy interviews. “I defy anybody to find a record – unless it’s some old blues record in 1922 – that uses feedback that way.”

Though not everyone agrees it was the first, the song in question became the Beatles’ eighth single and was released in November ’64. And it became a No. 1 hit in both the U.S. and UK.

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Freddie Mercury’s Queen is one of the great rock bands, but its musical style could swing from light pop to heavy metal. Now Brian May has spilt the beans on the band’s biggest influences, including The Beatles. Speaking with Guitar World last year, May said: “By that time I’d been exposed to Eric Clapton and Jimi Hendrix, and that was life-changing.”

The 72-year-old continued: “To us, Hendrix was the great god.

“I still can’t understand where that stuff came from. It’s like he came from another planet.

“I mentioned harmonies — I came from Buddy Holly and the Crickets, the Everly Brothers, the Beatles.

“The Beatles built our bible as far as musical composition, arrangement and production went.”

Source: George Simpson/express.co.uk

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John Lennon’s son Julian has revealed he recently had a cancer scare that saw him rushed to hospital and in need of an emergency operation.

The musician, 56, had to have a mole removed from his head, after being told the growth, that he’d had for all his life, had turned cancerous according to the results from a biopsy.

Within 48 hours, the mole was removed following emergency surgery and while the operation was a success, Julian revealed in a candid Facebook post that he is now waiting to receive more results back from further testing.

He admitted that the whole experience left him ‘shaking inside’, as the scare appeared to come from nowhere.

Julian wrote: ‘The trouble is… you think you have time. A few days ago, I went to visit my dermatologist here in LA when she noticed a little bump on my head that was actually a mole that had been there, along with a birthmark, for the last 57 years.’

Source: Katie Storey/metro.co.uk

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