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In 1964, The Beatles made a huge step towards fighting racial segregation by refusing to play a show that had split the audience without their consent.

Showing their support for the US civil rights movement, the iconic Liverpool four-piece refused to perform to a segregated concert at the Gator Bowl in Jacksonville, Florida. As the pressure of The Beatles’ act of defiance threatened to boil over, officials at the concert eventually allowed the segregated audience to merge together. Upon entering the stage, John Lennon said: “We never play to segregated audiences and we aren’t going to start now.”

“I’d sooner lose our appearance money,” he added.

Source: faroutmagazine.co.uk

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Former Rolling Stones bassist Bill Wyman recalled the moment when he looked up during an early performance and saw the Beatles in the audience.

The iconic meeting took place at the Crawdaddy Club in the Station Hotel in Richmond, England, on April 14, 1963. The Beatles had already logged two No.1 U.K. hits – “Please Please Me” and “From Me to You” – while the Stones were still 14 months away from their first visit to the top of the charts with “It’s All Over Now,” as Wyman told Uncle Joe Benson on the Ultimate Classic Rock Nights radio show.

“Halfway through the set we kind of glanced up, and there were four silhouetted leather-clad persons standing just in front of the bandstand in amongst all these kids who were all dancing and playing around,” he said, noting that John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr were “being totally ignored by the audience.” “I turned round to Charlie [Watts], and I said, ‘It’s the Beatles!’ They’d had two or three big No. 1 hits and they were like the rave of England at that time.

Source: ultimateclassicrock.com

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When you hear The Beatles called “the Fab Four,” you might picture an “all-for-one” scenario in which the band members worked as equals. That was certainly true in some respects, especially early on in the Beatles’ existence. However, in the studio, commercial forces tended to take over.

Geoff Emerick, who worked as the Beatles’ chief engineer on their greatest albums, summed it up in his book, Here, There and Everywhere. “Even from the earliest days, I felt the artist was John Lennon and Paul McCartney, not The Beatles,” Emerick wrote.

On top of the Lennon-McCartney compositions fueling the band’s stardom, Emerick cited the regular mistakes George Harrison and Ringo Starr made in the studio. While Emerick acknowledged George’s eventual growth as a guitarist, he wasn’t impressed by his playing on numerous dates.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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Through song, John Lennon attacked Christianity, Buddhism, Hinduism, and Taoism. George Harrison’s music made it clear he was a devout Hindu. Paul McCartney, on the other hand, did not make his religious beliefs (or lack thereof) a major part of his art. This raises the question: What are the former Beatles’ religious views?

If you listen to one of the Beatles’ most famous compositions, “Eleanor Rigby,” you’ll notice there’s some passing references to Christianity. One of the verses mentions a priest named Father McKenzie who delivers a sermon no one hears. In the song, Paul sings “No one was saved.”

The song could be interpreted as a lament over the lack of religiosity in contemporary Britain. At the very least, the song’s melancholy music makes Father McKenzie, the ineffectual priest, seem like a tragic and sympathetic character. However, Paul doesn’t have many nice things to say about religion.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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The official and verified Instagram account of the world-famous rock band, The Beatles, has shared a really rare photo of all the bandmates on their verified social media account.

In the photo, all the members were looking very attractive and happy. You may notice that someones were smoking when taken the photo.

And also, the Instagram account of The Beatles has captioned a never-heard-before section from the interview of John Lennon. In the interview of John Lennon, he was explained why The Beatles were so special for himself.

Here’s the section of John Lennon:

Source: Ugur Ustaer/metalheadzone.com

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John Lennon’s now famous “lost weekend” with May Pang was the subject of much attention and speculation from The Beatles fans back in the early 1970s, when he left his home with wife Yoko Ono in New York to set up house with their assistant May Pang in Los Angeles. Having first met Ono in 1966, Lennon married the avant-garde artist three years later. However, by 1973, the couple’s relationship had problems.

Ono has since recalled how the intensity of their partnership and the constant vitriol they faced from The Beatles fans — who largely blamed her for the break-up of the band — left her “needing space”.

It was at this point that Lennon, with his wife’s knowledge, embarked on a year-and-a-half romance with their assistant, Pang, whom Ono described in a 2012 interview with The Telegraph as “a very intelligent, attractive woman and extremely efficient”.

Source: Minnie Wright/express.co.uk

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The Beatles original drummer Pete Best has said that John, Paul and George continued to "put the boot in" even after they had dismissed him from the band and replaced him with Ringo Starr.  

Best (78) first met the Beatles, who were then called The Quarrymen, in 1959 when they played some of their first gigs at his mother's club, The Casbah, in suburban Liverpool and later joined the band in August 1960 after a phone call from Paul McCartney.

He went on to perform with them over 220 times, including many shows during their long stint in Hamburg. However, in what is perhaps showbusiness’s biggest bad luck story, the rest of the band kicked him out just as super stardom beckoned.  

Speaking on the Late Late Show on Friday night, Best, who has Irish relatives in Limerick and Dublin, said, "They could’ve been nicer, they put a load of boots in," he said.

Source: Alan Corr/rte.ie

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Help! The owner of a scary collection of waxwork heads is selling off the bonce of Beatles guitar legend George Harrison.

Colin Hill bought it for less than £200 five years ago and keeps it in a cabinet along with the heads of Britney Spears, Winston Churchill and a barely recognisable Princess Diana.

And the Fab Four fan hopes to make thousands if his sale plan can Come Together.

Retired hospital worker Colin, 59, waxes lyrical about his collection. He says: “At the auction they also had Ringo’s head but I was outbid for that. I don’t know what happened to Paul and John’s heads.

“It would have been nice to get both of them. They were from Madame Tussauds and had been left in a storeroom.

Source: Phil Cardy/mirror.co.uk

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Highly acclaimed since it made its stage debut in 2006, LOVE is a theatrical production by Cirque du Soleil which combines the re-produced and re-imagined music of The Beatles with an interpretive, circus-based artistic and athletic stage performance.

A joint venture between Cirque du Soleil and The Beatles’ Apple Corps Ltd, the three-time Grammy Award winning LOVE is described as “a Rock ‘n’ Roll poem”, inspired by the poetry of the Beatles’ lyrics and brought to life by a cast of world-class aerialists, acrobats and dancers. Music Director Giles Martin, son of the legendary Beatles producer, Sir George Martin, has heightened LOVE’s listening experience with a completely remixed soundtrack, noting “The show is the closest anyone can get to being in the studio with the band.”

The show plays at a specially built theatre at the Mirage in Las Vegas and uDiscover Music caught up with two Cirque du Soleil members, actor Uys De Buisson and acrobat Sophia Singleton, to discuss how The Beatles’ music connects with the LOVE cast. You can watch it in full below, but to whet your appetite, scroll down to read a few choice extracts.

Source: Tim Peacock/udis details

After the innovative Revolver (1966) and Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (1967), you might have believed The Beatles would keep topping themselves with every project. Then the band released the Magical Mystery Tour TV film on Boxing Day ’67.

Almost immediately, fans began phoning the BBC to say how much they hated what they’d seen. Going by the BBC’s reaction index, Magical Mystery Tour had the worst rating in history (23 out of 100). Critics pounced on the film as well, describing it as “rubbish,” “piffle,” or worse.

With the lack of plot and a considerable dose of psychedelia, The Beatles acknowledged they might have asked too much of its holiday audience. However, the BBC had its share of blame as well — it had shown a color film in black-and-white.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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