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Beatles News
Paul McCartney's Band on the Run - Sunday, August 25, 2019

Before we proceed with the album of the week, an abject renewal of one of my pleas to the technological innovators out there.

The Beatles will be marking the 50th anniversary of their second-to-last album, Abbey Road, with a Sept. 27 release that will include, among other formats, a 2-CD set containing a new stereo mix from the album and alternate versions of its songs; and a four-disc Super Deluxe edition with three CDs of stereo music, and a Blu-ray with high-resolution stereo, 5.1 surround and Dolby Atmos mixes. The latter is multi-directional sound, including above the listener's head.

Since the Beatles have so much influence nearly 50 years after they broke up (John Lennon said he was leaving the group during a Sept. 20, 1969 meeting with Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr), it would be nice if the Super Deluxe release of Abbey Road would prompt a proverbial kick in the rear to audio technicians to finally produce a pair of headphones that very convincingly simulates surround and Atmos effects. It would be a boon to those of us who live in condos and have neighbours who cannot even tolerate music played at low volumes.

Source: Joel Goldenberg The Suburban

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If you want to know how close George Harrison and Eric Clapton were, start with George’s first wife, Pattie Boyd. Harrison married Boyd, a model who’d appeared in the Beatles film A Hard Day’s Night, in 1966. By all accounts, they stayed happily married for the rest of the decade.

But by the end of the ’60s, Clapton had fallen madly in love with Boyd. Maybe George didn’t notice it at first, because he asked Clapton to play the guitar solo on “While My Guitar Gently Weeps” in 1968.

Later, he couldn’t help but notice. After George and Boyd split up in 1974, she began a relationship with Clapton and married him five years later. George remained friends with the two and attended their wedding. He’d even jokingly refer to himself as “the husband-in-law.”

Needless to say, the two had a friendship that was built to last. George even wrote a song for his pal that appeared on the Beatles’ White Album.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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Thirty members of the Philanthropic Educational Organization (PEO) gathered at Rose Marie Battey’s Chalmers Lake home and garden for their monthly meeting featuring a luncheon and presentation by Henry Feinberg on The Beatles. PEO is an organization of women which promotes education for women.

 PEO was founded 150 years ago and currently has 220,000 members in United States and Canada. Michigan has 4,700 members in chapters throughout the state. Marilyn Beckham, a member of Birmingham Chapter J, explains, “We meet in member’s homes, work to raise money for scholarships and have pleasant social times. We sponsor continuing education for members, also. During the history of PEO, $330,000,000 has been raised for women’s education. There is also a loan fund which only charges 2% for loans.”

As geese and swans floated peacefully by on the lake, musicologist Henry Feinberg, an instructor at Oakland Community College and piano teacher, began his fascinating talk on the history of The Beatles. His pleasant manner, sense of humor, and great fund of knowledge kept the audience attentive.

Source: Diane K. Bert/hometownlife.com

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The official Instagram account of the legendary late musician, John Lennon posted a really golden-worth photo of John and revealed a very little-known story of how Paul McCartney convinced John and other bandmates of not touring forever.

As you will read the story below, Paul McCartney called the band’s Cavern Club show ‘worse than those early days’ that the band played in front of only 23.000 fans.

Here is the story: Amidst hangers and locker cubbies, John Lennon lounges backstage before the Beatles’ show at Busch Memorial Stadium in St. Louis, Missouri, on August 21, 1966, photographed by Bob Bonis. These few moments of peace turned out to be fleeting, as once The Beatles took the stage, they were pummelled with a downpour. Though the venue had constructed a makeshift shelter out of slivers of corrugated iron, rain still dripped on the amps and created a downright soggy attitude in the band.

Source: Enes K./metalheadzone.com

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So often the ‘forgotten’ Beatle, Ringo Starr remained the backbone of the band that kept the rest in tow. With the least writing credits to his name, it seemingly became a common lazy joke in reference to Ringo’s impact—or lack thereof—on the success of The Beatles.

However, Ringo’s unorthodox drumming style has given the band some of their most memorable moments in their songs. Take, for instance, the John Lennon-written bluesy classic ‘Come Together’. Starr’s drums on this single are noticeable from the first few bars which sits perfectly alongside McCartney’s chilled bass line. Starr once explained how he “plays with his shoulder” which leads to some off-beat instances that make some of his songs hard to repeat with the same results.

Source: Far Out Magazine

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Orchestra Kentucky will celebrate 50th anniversary of the Beatles’ iconic “Abbey Road” with a performance of entire album at the Southern Kentucky Performing Arts Center on Saturday, Sept. 21. Featuring “Something,” and “Come Together,” the Beatles’ 11th studio recording was released in September 1969 and included one of the most discussed album covers of all-time.

Prices begin at just $17, with tickets available online any time at OrchestraKentucky.com, by calling the Orchestra Kentucky administrative offices at (270) 846-2426 open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays, or by calling the SKyPAC Box Office at (270) 904-1880 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays.

“The Beatles have been a big part of the Retro Series since the series began,” said Orchestra Kentucky Music Director Jeff Reed. “I knew I wanted to feature their music in Orchestra Kentucky’s 20th season, and the 50th anniversary of Abbey Road afforded the perfect opportunity. We are going to perform Abbey Road in its entirety, as close to the original recording as humanly possible, and then have a second half of the Beatles’ greatest hits.”

Source: Matt Wickstrom/lanereport.com details

1969. Before the year was out, we proved you could put a man on the moon. You could gather half a million people together in the name of peace and music. But you could not, for love nor money, keep together four young men who were outgrowing the band that had changed the culture forever.

The last year of the 1960s was as busy for the Beatles as it was tumultuous. Within 12 months they would record two albums: Abbey Road — celebrating the 50th anniversary of its U.S. release in October, and Let it Be, with an accompanying film that documented both the fighting and the genius present in the studio. Individually, John Lennon, Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr and George Harrison pursued separate lives. Two of them married; one became a father; all of them readied their post-Beatles solo debuts. But before they went their own ways, they began the year with an electrifying live set — their first since 1966 — on a London rooftop.

Source: By Saleah Blancaflor  /People Magazine

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Paul McCartney has referred to the Beatles’ White Album (1968) as “the tension album,” and you only need to hear a few of the stories to understand what he meant. You might as well start with the time he and John Lennon nearly got into a fistfight in the studio.

That confrontation occurred during the recording of “Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da.” By the time Paul was content with the endless takes and new arrangements on that song, Grammy-winning engineer Geoff Emerick had quit his job in the control room. A month later, Ringo walked out on the band.

We haven’t even mentioned George Harrison leaving for Greece out of frustration during the sessions for “Not Guilty” (a song that later got bumped). In short, Beatles morale was at or near its lowest point while making The White Album.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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The Music in My Head – 8/20/19 - Thursday, August 22, 2019

A good one today from George Harrison! It’s really a tribute to his old bandmate, John Lennon, who was shot and killed in December of 1980. The following Spring, George released a song called, “All Those Years Ago.” He had actually written the song already, but after what happened to John, he decided to write some special lyrics, and dedicate it to John’s memory. Obvously, a lot of people liked it! The song made it all the way to #2 in the country, and stayed there for 3 straight weeks, and the only reason it didn’t top the charts is because it came out at the same time with “Bette Davis Eyes,” a giant hit record by Kim Carnes. George got a lot of help on this one, too, from Ringo Starr on drums, and Paul McCartney on bass. In fact, Paul had Wings at the time, so Denny Laine ended up on keys and background vocals, and Paul’s wife, Linda, also sang on the song. George had certainly had his share of differences with John over the years, but if you listen to the song and pay attention to the words, it’s apparent that he obviously looked up to him—almost like a big brother. 

Source: Ron Stutts/chapelboro.com

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By the late ’60s, many Beatles fans probably couldn’t recognize the band that once serenaded the world with “Love Me Do” and “I Want to Hold Your Hand.” They had long hair and beards, no longer played live concerts, and wrote songs like “Strawberry Fields Forever” and “It’s All Too Much.”

There were many reasons for the changes, and drugs had to rank somewhere near the top of that list. After Rubber Soul, their full-fledged pothead record, the band made the acid-tinged Revolver and equally far-out Sgt. Pepper’s.

But drugs only counted as one reason. The band’s full commitment to the studio and maturity as songwriters encouraged them to take their music as far as they could. George Harrison’s backwards guitar solo and John Lennon’s “I Am the Walrus” came from a few of those efforts.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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The Beatles didn’t take long to catch the attention of the top names in the music industry. In the summer of 1964, Bob Dylan insisted on visiting the band in New York. And when 1965’s Rubber Soul hit the airwaves, The Beach Boys were simply knocked out by it.

By ’65, The Beach Boys had already notched multiple No. 1 hits and had many more chart successes. However, they weren’t taken terribly seriously, as they mostly sung about catching waves and dating girls with cool cars. In some ways, their songwriting was like The Beatles’ had been in 1964.

But that changed after hearing tracks like “In My Life,” “Girl,” and other knockout songs from Rubber Soul. For Brian Wilson, the creative force behind The Beach Boys, he now had a mission: to top The Beatles’ latest album.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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Ringo Starr does jumping-jacks on the edge of the stage as he sings “Yellow Submarine” to an audience of one: me. It’s the day before he’s due to kick-off the North American leg of his All-Starr Band’s 30th-anniversary tour, and the group are rehearsing at the very un-rock ‘n’ roll hour of 10:30 a.m. They maneuver with the power and agility of a pro sports team training for the championship. Yesterday was the first time they’d played together since they wrapped a string of Japanese dates three months earlier, but the 14th incarnation of the ever-evolving supergroup sounds as tight as ever. A handful of sound technicians and crew jog busily around the empty Colosseum Theater at Caesar’s Palace in Windsor, Ontario. Tomorrow, every one of the 5,000 seats will be filled but for now, I am the sum total of the roaring crowd and I applaud as the song comes to an end. It’s the only socially acceptable way to vent my excitement. It’s not every day you get a private show from a Beatle.

Source: Jordan Runtagh/people.com

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The Beatles’ body of work has been so worshipped, scrutinized and dissected that 50 years later, one could wonder what’s left to discover. After all, how much more can one say about “Abbey Road”? It’s arguably the greatest album by the greatest group of all time, and is one of the premiere artistic statements of its era. And as the final album the Beatles made together — it was recorded after “Let It Be” but released before  — it was created in a spirit of pre-breakup détente: The Beatles knew they were splitting up, so they made one last big effort for the team, and consequently, “Abbey Road” has none of the tension and contentiousness of “The White Album” and “Let It Be.” It’s all harmony, in every sense of the word.

Although the Beatles’ catalog has already been revisited several times — first on CD in the ‘80s, then the “Anthology” rarities series in the ‘90s, then in meticulously remastered stereo editions in the ‘00s, then in mono, and now in 50th anniversary editions — each one has revealed tantalizing surprises for longtime fans.

Source: Jem Aswad/var details

Sunday marked 55 years since the fab four made a whole lot of Winnipeggers twist and shout without singing or strumming a single note during their little visit to the city. George Harrison waves, upper left, as he and Ringo Starr, right, John Lennon, lower left, and Paul McCartney, not pictured, descend the steps of their plane after landing at the Winnipeg airport on Aug. 18, 1964. (CBC)

The Beatles landed at the Winnipeg airport on Aug. 18, 1964. Their brief stopover on the tarmac was punctuated by screams and cries from the droves of young fans who flocked to the airport to greet them.

"It's the first place that they ever set foot in Canada," said music historian John Einarson. "They didn't come and play, they didn't come and perform, but they came for the fans ... and fuel."

Source: cbc.ca

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How Many Beatles Have Been Knighted? - Sunday, August 18, 2019

When The Beatles received their MBE awards from Queen Elizabeth in 1965, they still hadn’t hit their creative or commercial peak. That would come a few years later with Sgt. Pepper’s, The White Album, and Abbey Road.

But they’d already started their march up the ladder of British society, as far as royal honors are concerned. At the time, John Lennon wasn’t all that impressed with his MBE, and a few years later he returned his to Buckingham Palace with a cheeky note addressed to the queen.

As for the other Beatles, they seemed to have more respect for the honor — especially drummer Ringo Starr. “I was never giving mine back,” he said later. “It meant a lot.”

The same went for Paul McCartney, always the less disruptive half of the Lennon-McCartney alliance. That attitude likely served Paul well when his name came up for knighthood in the 1990s. For a while, it appeared he’d be the only Beatle who’d ever be addressed as “sir.”

Source: cheatsheet.com

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It was an acid trip with Peter Fonda, who has died at the age of 79, that inspired John Lennon to write one of The Beatles’ classic album tracks.

In 1965, the actor – who would go on to co-write and star in counterculture classic Easy Rider four years later – was enjoying a night out with the Fab Four when George Harrison, high on LSD, feared he would die.

Fonda, who survived a near-fatal shooting accident as a child, told The Post in 2000: “I was saying, ‘Don’t worry George, it’s OK. I know what it’s like to be dead. We’ll tell you what’s true. You can form your own view.

These words of encouragement, though, confused Lennon. Fonda recalled: “Lennon looks over and says, ‘You know what it’s like to be dead? Who put all that s*** in your head? You’re making me feel like I’ve never been born.'"

Source: Jacob Stolworthy/independent.co.uk

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After recording the groundbreaking Revolver (1966) album, The Beatles realized they’d given everything to the music but still didn’t have a name for the record. So they nearly used a goofy titles like Fat Man and Bobby or After Geography (Ringo’s idea, as a send-up of the Stones’ Aftermath).

Later, the Fab Four continued its run of uninspired album titles. The 1968 double record known as The White Album actually went out as a self-titled release (The Beatles). For their final album, they simply used the name of the street where their studio was located (Abbey Road).

In brief, The Beatles were much better at writing music and titling songs than they were as naming albums. If they weren’t using a pun like Rubber Soul or Revolver, they were barely giving the record a title at all.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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It was 50 years ago tomorrow, Sergeant Pepper told the band to stop playing. And with the final C-major from their last song, prophetically titled The End, still ringing in the air, the four greatest popular musicians Britain has ever ­produced packed up their instruments and walked away. They’d been together since John Lennon was 17 and Paul McCartney 15 – 12 long years of furious ­creativity, forged in the dank cellar of The Cavern and the grubby dives of Hamburg, and ending up on top of the world. In that time they’d recorded a staggering 213 songs. But for The Beatles, August 18, 1969, was the day the music died.

To the outside world there was no ­warning, no hint of the earthquake to come. The sun-splashed month had started with a photoshoot resulting in the most iconic ­picture in the history of pop music.

It ended in an uneasy truce between the four ­warring members, each ­desperately looking for a way out of their magic circle.

Source: Christopher Wilson/express.co.uk

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Attention Beatles fans: we’ve found a loophole to Paul McCartney‘s pricey concert tickets. The music icon will be celebrating his new children’s book, Hey Grandude! with a book signing at Waterstones bookstore in London – and the tickets are surprisingly cheap.

Alternative Nation reports that the tickets are on sale for £14, which equals about 17 U.S. dollars. Considering that fact that McCartney’s concerts typically sell for a few hundred bucks, this is quite the bargain. Customers will not only have the chance to meet McCartney, but can bring up to two children or grandchildren and walk way with a signed copy of Hey Grandude! Guests will also have the chance to meet the book’s illustrator, Kathryn Durst. There’s a strict no-access policy for non ticket holders so guests should make sure they’ve secured a ticket before arriving. The announcement also states that all bags, cameras and mobile phone devices must be placed in a bag drop prior to entering, so it’s not known if guests will be able to get photos with the Beatles icon.

Source: Catherine Santino/fatherly.com

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It took a half-century, but Ringo’s rockin’ a rooftop again — and he’s doing it in New York.

Fifty years after he and his fellow Beatles played atop London’s Apple Corps headquarters, Ringo Starr will be performing a rooftop concert with his All-Starr Band Sunday at Manhattan’s Pier 17 to wrap up a three-day weekend of Empire State shows.

The drummer-singer, 79, is still getting by with a little help from his friends — and loving New York, where the Beatles introduced themselves to America in 1964 when they touched down at JFK airport.

“No one will understand the emotion of us landing in America,” Starr told the Daily News. “But it was New York, and all of the music we loved came from there. It was just far out.

Source: Peter Sblendorio/nydailynews.com

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The Mersey Beatles, a Liverpool-born Beatles tribute band and the house band for over a decade at the world-famous Cavern Club, will perform Oct. 11 at Benton Civic Center.

Celebrating the 50th anniversary of "Abbey Road," the band will play the entire album live followed by a set of greatest hits.

Julia Baird, John Lennon's sister and the director of the Cavern Club, will be in attendance selling and signing copies of her book "Imagine This: Growing Up with My Brother John Lennon" at the general merchandise table before, during and after the show.

"The Mersey Beatles have been playing the Cavern Club for over 15 years and are one of the best you will see," Baird said.

The Mersey Beatles are no ordinary tribute band. They are the official Beatles tribute band representing the city of Liverpool, and from 2002 to 2012 they were the resident tribute band at The Cavern Club, the nightclub in Liverpool, England, where The Beatles perfected their act before launching a global rock music revolution in the 1960s.

Source: Benton News/carbondaletimes.com

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A book described as an “extraordinary visual memoir” is coming from perhaps the most famous muse of all time, Pattie Boyd. The model, photographer and author is, of course, the former wife of both George Harrison and Eric Clapton. Pattie Boyd: My Life Through a Lens, is being published April 7, 2020, via Simon and Schuster’s Insight Editions imprint.

It’s available for pre-order below.

Born in England on March 17, 1944, Boyd pursued a successful modeling career before meeting the Beatles’ George Harrison on the set of the 1964 film, A Hard Day’s Night. The two married when she was just 21, on January 21, 1966, and Boyd became a source of inspiration for Harrison’s songwriting, sparking his interest in meditation and Eastern philosophy.

Source: Best Classic Bands Staff

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By the end of the Beatles’ great run as recording artists, George Harrison was writing and performing on the level of bandmates John Lennon and Paul McCartney. But it definitely didn’t start out that way.

In fact, John and Paul considered George something of a lesser Beatle in the early 1960s. Part of it was his age (George was the youngest band member), but it also had to do with the quality of his original tunes. Later, John spoke of an “embarrassing period when George’s songs weren’t that good.”

Though John was likely referring to the time around 1964’s A Hard Day’s Night (on which George had zero songs), another rough patch for him popped up during the recording of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. As many fans know, George only has “Within Without You” on that album.

George did introduce another song earlier in the Sgt. Pepper sessions, but it didn’t make the cut. In the studio, it was greeted with apathy from John and a lot of negative feedback from producer George Martin and his team.

 

Source: cheatsheet.com

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The Fab Four were just a group of music-loving teens from Liverpool before becoming cultural and musical icons.

Before John, Paul, George and Ringo became The Beatles, they were simply four teenagers from Liverpool. Never could John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr have imagined they would go on to form one of the most successful groups in modern history, influencing the popular culture in not only music, but also fashion, film, and global representation.

In the late 1950s and early 1960s, it was difficult to imagine a band hailing from the relatively poor northwest port city of Liverpool, England, could get a gig in the thriving London music scene of the south, let alone export their eventual homegrown success to a world eagerly opening up to the counter-culture movement of the 60s and the burgeoning phenomenon that was called rock 'n' roll.

Source: biography.com

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While there are more brilliant Paul McCartney tracks than you can count, a few songs stand out a half-century after he recorded them with The Beatles. At or near the top of the list is “Hey Jude,” the 1968 smash that continues to inspire singalongs wherever it plays.

That track, which Paul wrote for John Lennon’s son Julian, became the first release on the band’s Apple record label. But by then, Paul had already penned a number of eternal classics. The list includes “Yesterday,” which became one of the most-played songs in radio history.

Then there is “Penny Lane,” a song which couldn’t have come from any other band or been written by anyone other than Paul. The 1967 single, released with John’s stunning “Strawberry Fields Forever” on the B side, ranks as one of the finest recordings of the band’s career.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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Will you see Paul or Ringo Live in 2019