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Yoko Ono didn’t break up the Beatles — so say some Beatles fans after watching a new documentary about the legendary band.

“Get Back,” a three-part documentary series directed by Peter Jackson and airing on Disney+, follows John, Paul, George and Ringo as they make their last album together, 1970’s Let It Be.
Many fans watching the documentary felt the footage shown in the series proves that Yoko Ono was not a meddling, corrosive influence on the Beatles, as she is often characterized, but rather more of a benign presence.

Source: etcanada.com

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JOHN LENNON held a meeting with Paul McCartney in 1969 where he spoke about what he didn't like about The Beatles and his regrets from the band's career.


The Beatles' latest documentary, Get Back, hit Disney Plus over the past week and showed off a new side to the Fab Four. Part two of the three-part series included a scene that showed John Lennon pulling Paul McCartney aside to air some grievances he had. They met at a cafeteria away from prying eyes - and cameras - to sort out their problems, and to discuss George Harrison's growing frustrations with the band's songwriting process.

Source: Callum Crumlish/express.co.uk

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"The Lyrics: 1956 to the Present" by Paul McCartney (Liveright) is a massive, 960-page memoir and career overview by the Beatle, spanning 154 of his most important songs and the stories of their composition, as well as his life, partnerships, and the people who inspired him.

In the excerpt below, McCartney writes about his Old English sheepdog, Martha, which was an inspiration for his 1968 song "Martha My Dear," from The Beatles' "White Album."

Source: cbsnews.com

 

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The Beatles‘ rooftop concert is one of the most famous concerts in the history of classic rock. During an interview, Paul McCartney revealed the concert was designed to anger a certain type of listener. Notably, The Beatles played “Don’t Let Me Down” during the concert. The song garnered a different reaction at the concert than it did on the pop charts.

The Beatles' Paul McCartney holding a guitar
The Guardian reports several businessmen were in the vicinity of The Beatles when they performed their rooftop concert. One of these businessmen said The Beatles’ concert disrupted his work. Paul compared this man to a character in A Hard Days’ Night who got upset at the Fab Four and commented that he fought in World War II for “your lot.” Ringo Starr retorted “I bet you’re sorry you won!”

Source: cheatsheet.com

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Paul McCartney sits in a chair, bass guitar propped on his knees, and plucks out a riff — nothing fancy, not yet, though he can tell he might be onto something. (His years in the world’s biggest rock band have sharpened his instincts.) Slowly — though not so slowly! — a vocal cadence begins to take shape, then a melody, then a lyric about getting back to where you once belonged. McCartney looks over at George Harrison, his band mate in the Beatles, who’s lounging across from him inside a cold London studio in January 1969, and lets his eyes sparkle ever so slightly: He’s just created “Get Back,” which will go on to become a rock classic still beloved by fans half a century later.

Source: Mikael Wood, Randall Roberts, Gustavo Arellano/latimes.com

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What exactly happened between George Harrison and the other Beatles that triggered him to quit the band? Peter Jackson's Get Back explores this.

Why did George Harrison leave The Beatles and how is this explored in the new Peter Jackson documentary series The Beatles: Get Back? The Disney+ series premiered on November 25, 2021, and it was a huge hit worldwide. Peter Jackson used old footage shot during the making of The Beatles' 1970 album, Let It Be. This was their last album, and it was recorded during the months leading to their definitive breakup. However, Jackson wanted to reuse the Beatles footage (originally shot by Michael Lindsay-Hogg for his film Let It Be) to create a more upbeat interpretation of The Beatles' last months.

Source: Marta Zabo/screenrant.com

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The Beatles took over the world in their heyday. It seemed as though everyone was obsessed with The Beatles, maybe even more so than John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr. In one 1967 interview, George Harrison said the band, to him, was “just a hobby.”It didn’t take too long for Harrison to grow accustomed to the life of the rich and famous. And not too long after that, he grew tired of it. In early interviews, one could hear his excitement about his life, or read it on the page. But as time went on, he became jaded. When Harrison was interviewed by Melody Maker in 1967, he said the band hardly worked for their success anymore. Everything came easy.

Source:cheatsheet.com

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In light of the recent release of Peter Jackson’s new Disney+ docuseries, The Beatles: Get Back, we’re looking back at some of the great movies and documentaries that came before it highlighting the Fab Four.

Directed by Broadway veteran Julie Taymor (The Lion King), this 2007 rock musical fantasia employs 33 of the Beatles’ most indelible songs to take audiences on a magical mystery tour through the turbulent 1960s. Most of the cult favorite’s character names come from Beatles lyrics: Lucy (Evan Rachel Wood), an upper-class suburban transplant in New York, falls into a star-crossed love affair with Jude (Jim Sturgess), a former Liverpool ship welder. Her brother Max (Joe Anderson) is a rebellious college student who is later drafted. The boundary-breaking film boasts a feast of ecstatic, hallucinatory music sequences, including an Uncle Sam poster coming to animated life, bleeding strawberries—and even Army recruits carrying the Statue of Liberty across a Vietnamese jungle in their underwear.

Source: Christopher Wallenberg/tvinsider.com

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They Shall Not Grow Old was the title Peter Jackson gave to the first documentary he made, and he could have named his latest exactly the same way. Instead it is called Get Back, and while the earlier film restored archive footage of the young British men who fought the first world war, this new one – nearly eight hours long and making its debut in three parts this weekend – does the same for the young British men who conquered the world by more peaceful means; four of them to be precise, known for ever as the Beatles.

Obsessives across the globe have had their anoraks zipped up in readiness for a while, eager to study the differences between the ninth and 13th take of Don’t Let Me Down, but the resonance of these films is not confined to muso aficionados alone. On the contrary, they have something to say to anyone interested in Britain and how it’s changed – and in the universal themes of friendship, creativity, regret, loss and time.

Source: Jonathan Freedland/theguardian.com

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Peter Jackson’s Beatles series Get Back is a feast for one particular kind of fan

Eight hours of restored, previously unseen archival footage gives obsessives a wealth of new revelations
Peter Jackson’s eight-hour Disney Plus docuseries The Beatles: Get Back, an extended behind-the-scenes accounting of the recording of Let It Be, features one particular scene that foreshadows The Beatles’ dissolution. It’s January 1969, and the group is desperately trying to flesh out their new song “Two of Us.” They’re under immense pressure. For this project, they’ve tasked themselves with writing and arranging 14 new songs to be recorded live, for a studio audience, in two weeks’ time. Cameras are there to capture their effort. They also capture John Lennon and Paul McCartney ganging up on poor George Harrison, squeezing out any sonic space for his guitar. Harrison quits the band, throwing the future of the inchoate album into jeopardy.

Source: Robert Daniels/polygon.com

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Peter Jackson has said Disney wanted to remove all swearing from his The Beatles: Get Back documentary, but were convinced otherwise by Ringo Starr and Paul McCartney.

The director’s three-part film charts the making of the band’s penultimate studio album ‘Let It Be’, and shows their final concert on London’s Savile Row rooftop in its entirety.

Speaking to NME, Jackson recalled Starr and McCartney’s first reactions to the documentary, who, to the director’s surprise, didn’t ask for any changes to be made.

“When they got to see the finished thing, I was expecting notes,” Jackson said. “It would’ve just been normal to get a note saying: ‘Oh, that bit where I say that – could you cut that out?’ Or ‘could you shorten the conversation there?’ And I didn’t get a single note. Not one request to do anything.

Source: Adam Starkey/nme.com

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In 1999, a man attacked George Harrison and his wife Olivia in their home, Friar Park. The man attacked George with a kitchen knife and stabbed him 40 times until Olivia could knock him out with a lamp and a fireplace poker. George was recovering from throat cancer, but he had to get part of his lung removed due to the attack. When the news of the home invasion broke, Tom Petty was fearful that his friend was gravely injured.Unfortunately, many believe that the attack took years off George’s life. He was just getting over his first bout of cancer, but it returned later on. Fortunately, when the time came, George left his body the way he wanted and with dignity in 2001.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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I’ve just finished the third part of Peter Jackson’s “Get Back,” which ends with the Beatles on the roof at Apple Records, 3 Savile Row after 22 days of rehearsing in January 1969, recording, praying, squabbling, and in the end, coming together.

In Part 3, the group is faced with the decision made by filmmaker Michael Lindsay Hogg, producer George Martin, and recording engineer Glyn Johns that they will indeed play a show on the roof. This is their first live performance since 1966, and, as it turns out, their last ever.

Much happens in the two hours preceding the performance. Paul McCartney, perhaps seeing his control over the situation ebbing, doesn’t want to do it. But John and Ringo do, and George comes around. Once they’re on the roof, all the tension and creative architecture of the preceding 22 days disappears. It’s really a joyous moment. If you know the “Let it Be” from 50 years ago, this much longer take on what happened is incredibly gratifying.

Source: Roger Friedman/showbiz411.com

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Fans may have heard about the fateful moment where George Harrison quit The Beatles for several days in 1969 before. But, despite the fact that Harrison’s walkout was captured on film by Let It Be director Michael Lindsay-Hogg, almost no one has seen the footage—until now. The Beatles: Get Back Part 1, the first of a three-part docuseries from Peter Jackson that is now streaming on Disney+, concludes with what may have been one of the Fab Four’s most dramatic moments.

The scene comes at the very end of Part 1, during The Beatles’ seventh day rehearsing at Twickenham. The band is under incredible pressure to write a new album, record it, and rehearse it for a live show in just 22 days’ time, and tensions are running high. The band is rehearsing their new song, “Get Back,” and Paul McCartney is offering Harrison some direction.

Source: Anna Menta/decider.com

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'The Beatles: Get Back' Review - Thursday, November 25, 2021

Peter Jackson’s three-part documentary chronicles an intensely productive month for the band, culminating in the legendary Jan. 30, 1969, public performance that would be its last.They might have been the most famous musicians in the world, but there was a bit of understandable nerves when The Beatles convened just after New Year’s in 1969. For the past two years they’d sworn off touring, focusing instead on studio experimentation with such aurally adventurous releases as Sgt. Pepper’s and Magical Mystery Tour. Now they wanted to write songs together again, the old-fashioned way, and perform them in front of people.

Source: Sheri Linden/hollywoodreporter.com

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‘The Beatles: Get Back’ Review: Peter Jackson’s Documentary Epic Is an Addictive Look at Who the Beatles Were

A heady expansion of the "Get Back" footage becomes an essential diary of the group's greatness.
How does anyone, especially a Beatle, write a melody? The answer may be as simple as it is mysterious. In “The Beatles: Get Back,” Peter Jackson’s sprawling and revelatory fly-on-the-studio-wall documentary, there’s a great moment when we get to see it happen. It’s January 1969, and the Beatles — long-haired, scruffy, bearded, looking less like the “lads” they still call themselves than the grown men they’ve become — have taken over the colorfully dank, cavernous Twickenham Studios. There, they have just three weeks to create and rehearse 14 songs, at which point they’re supposed to play them in front of a live audience for a TV special. (They’re locked into the timing because Ringo has been cast to star opposite Peter Sellers in “The Magic Christian,” a movie set to begin shooting on Jan. 24.)

Source: David Bauder/clickondetroit.com

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The nominations for the 2022 Grammy Awards were announced Tuesday, and AC/DC, Foo Fighters, Paul McCartney and the late Chris Cornell all received multiple nominations.

All four artists will compete for the Best Rock Album prize, nominees for which include AC/DC’s Power Up, Foo Fighters’ Medicine at Midnight, McCartney’s McCartney III, and Cornell’s posthumous No One Sings Like You Anymore Vol. 1.

Among the Best Rock Song nominees are Foo Fighters’ “Waiting on a War,” McCartney’s “Find My Way,” and the Wolfgang Van Halen-led Mammoth WVH‘s “Distance.”

For Best Rock Performance, the nominees include AC/DC’s “Shot in the Dark,” Foo Fighters’ “Making a Fire,” Cornell’s cover of Prince‘s “Nothing Compares 2 U.”

Meanwhile, AC/DC’s video for “Shot in the Dark” scored a nod in the Best Music Video category.

Source: z99fm.com

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When Peter Jackson’s new docuseries The Beatles: Get Back launches on Disney+ this Thursday, his three-part, six-hour deep dive into the making of the Beatles’ Let It Be album will redefine the fractious period in the band’s history for even the most diehard armchair historians, while also giving a stunningly intimate look into the creative processes of arguably the greatest collaborative relationship of the last 100 years.

“I was always moaning about the original film, because there was no real joy in it,” Ringo Starr recalls of the original 1970 documentary film Let It Be, released just weeks after news that the Beatles had split had hit the press. “I think everyone will enjoy Get Back, though, because you get to see this band work really hard and go through emotional ups and downs to get to where we got in the end. And we did get there. Every time.”

Source: Jeff Slate /insidehook.com

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A new documentary about The Beatles streams on Disney+ November 25. Produced by Lord of the Rings director Peter Jackson, it casts new light on the legendary band’s final days. The Let It Be sessions were famously turbulent.
Director Peter Jackson spent four years assembling a documentary of footage about The Beatles’ Let It Be sessions. Originally filmed for the accompanying film of the same name, the nearly 200 hours of video and audio footage ultimately went unused. Jackson narrowed it down to seven hours, showing much more than the well-known infighting and drama behind the band’s final album.

Source: thegreatcoursesdaily.com

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It’s not quite as difficult as hobbits driving to Mordor to destroy Sauron’s ring, but Peter Jackson‘s undertook four years to bring an end to the long and winding road of life The Beatles. The result is 7 hours The Beatles: Go back, which restored Jackson from 60 hours of studio sessions to a rooftop concert. Everything was shot in 1969 by Michael Lindsay-Hogg for his film let it be at a time when Apple forbade him to contain much that created understanding and context of the group’s creative process and difficulties that led to controversy and separation. A fan of the hits John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison in the Ringo Starr since he was a pint-sized kiwi, Jackson used the technical cleaning process that brought his WWI documentary to life. They will not grow old so that it seems as if you are watching live matches. The film will be released from 25-27. November shown in three parts at Disney +. Here he explains the monumental task and reveals who really broke up the band. Contrary to legend, it was not Yoko.

Source: knews.uk

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The Beatles reconvened at George Harrison's home in the spring of 1968 upon their return from Rishikesh, India. It was time to get to work.

They recorded 26 rough demos — five from Harrison, 14 from John Lennon and seven from Paul McCartney. The next step was to take the tapes to the studio for refinement and recording, but one song among the McCartney contributions did not jibe with the others.

"Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da" had begun to take form while the Beatles were still in India expanding their spiritual horizons and embracing the practice of meditation. One day, author and fellow meditation student Paul Saltzman witnessed McCartney and Lennon begin to work out the structure of the song.

Source: ultimateclassicrock.com

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Let it Be was a divisive project. The original concept was that The Beatles would set up in Twickenham Film studios in January 1969 to write and record a new set of songs. Cameras would film their every move until after only three weeks they would perform these as a live TV concert.

It was, even for them, a ridiculously ambitious plan. As the days wore on it became apparent it wasn’t going to happen. Tensions mounted and eventually the band opted for the famous rooftop performance instead.

Chastened, perhaps, by this experience the Beatles took a break before reconvening back in Abbey Road Studios, to record one more masterpiece. With George Martin back at the helm, normal service was resumed. Abbey Road is many people’s favourite Beatles album.

It was only at this point that it all unravelled. Wildly different views of how their business concerns should be managed, the intrusion of new relationships and differing artist visions became their undoing. John, in particular, wanted out.

Source: Tom Dunne/irishexaminer.com

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This Thursday marks the release of the first episode of The Beatles: Get Back on Disney+. The six-hour three-parter features tons of unseen footage and audio of John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr during their 1969 recording sessions of their last album Let It Be. A special premiere of the new documentary took place in Hollywood last week attended by friends and family of the Fab Four.

Alongside Stella McCartney and Olivia Harrison, were John’s sons Julian Lennon and Sean Ono Lennon.

Julian’s mother was the Beatle’s first wife Cynthia Powell and Sean’s is his second Yoko Ono.

Now his firstborn has shared his reaction to The Beatles: Get Back with an emotional message on his Instagram.

He wrote: “What an Amazing night, firstly seeing Get Back & then Stella’s Event afterwards…”

Source: George Simpson/express.co.uk

 

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The Beatles: Get Back will show The Beatles like fans have never seen them before. Director Peter Jackson pored over all the footage captured for the film Let It Be and assembled previously unreleased footage into a new three part series. Jackson promised many surprises for Beatles fans, including one moment where George Harrison put his foot down with John Lennon and Paul McCartney.

The personalities of each of The Beatles came through to Jackson as he reviewed the footage. He found Harrison to be the voice of reason.

“George, I love,” Jackson said. “One, he’s the pragmatic one which everyone needs that.”

The Beatles: Get Back shows the band discussing their final concert in the theater ruins in Libya. That concert might have been even more elaborate if Lennon and McCartney had gotten their way. Apparently, Ringo Starr stayed out of it.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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If he hadn’t become a musician, Paul McCartney says, he would probably have been an English teacher. He has fond memories of his English teacher, Alan Durband, who studied with FR Leavis and taught the young Paul the value of close reading. When he wrote songs with John Lennon, the chords and melody came first. But the words mattered too. Where the straight-up, irony-free early lyrics wooed their audience through a flurry of pronouns – She Loves You, From Me to You, Please Please Me, etc – the later lyrics aspired to poetry.

Source: Blake Morrison/theguardian.com

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