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The Beatles officially parted ways in April 1970, but the writing had been on the wall for a while. In fact, John Lennon told the other members of the band he was leaving late in ’69.

By then, the band was feuding over money and who would be the next manager. Meanwhile, John had already recorded albums with Yoko Ono and jammed with Eric Clapton. He was ready to go out on his own. In 1971, he chalked up his first No. 1 solo album with Imagine.

But Paul McCartney, who by then had become something of an adversary, had already topped the charts with his first solo effort. Paul’s record landed right around the same time as the final Fab Four studio album, Let It Be. (Yes, the other Beatles resented the timing of the release.)

Source: cheatsheet.com

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The Beatles legend Paul McCartney recently shared a throwback photo of himself in his dressing room, and he looks stunning!

Michael Eavis has hinted that Sir Paul McCartney will perform at Glastonbury next year.

The music festival’s founder is hoping the Beatles icon will headline his Worthy Farm venue in Somerset for the 50th anniversary show.

He said, “Paul’s on good form at the moment.”

When asked if he had “spoken to him” and if he was coming to Worthy Farm, Michael told BBC Somerset, “Hopefully for the 50th, yeah.

“Don’t make a big thing of it though will you?”

Source: Brett Buchanan/

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John Lennon began chronicling his love for Yoko Ono in the late '60s, and that narrative continued through a posthumous album released years after his murder.

In the end, these songs would account for half of Lennon's four U.K. chart toppers – beginning with the Beatles' "Ballad of John and Yoko." Recorded during an April 14, 1969 session with Paul McCartney, the single took fans into the flurry of activity surrounding their nuptials – including their difficulties, because of residency requirements, in finding a venue.

"It was very romantic. It's all in the song, 'The Ballad of John and Yoko,'" Lennon told Rolling Stone in 1970. "If you want to know how it happened, it's in there."

Source: ultimateclassicrock.com

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When you listen to the earliest Beatles albums, you are transported to a simple time in rock history. Hearing “I Want to Hold Your Hand,” the band’s first No. 1 U.S. hit, it’s impossible to imagine this innocent gang going on to record The White Album five years later.

But those five years were a lifetime for a band whose every move was watched by fans and dissected by critics. By the time John Lennon was writing “Yer Blues” and Paul McCartney recording “Helter Skelter,” that innocence seemed long gone.

However, when the Fab Four went their separate ways a few years later, no one in the band had turned 30. In brief, they were still very young men. It’s a reminder of how incredibly young — and, yes, innocent — they were when they first arrived in America (kicking off Beatlemania) in 1964.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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After The Beatles breakup in April 1970, it didn’t take long for members of the band to tell their version of the story in song. Late that year, George Harrison offered an elegant tune about late-Beatles squabbling on his debut solo work, All Things Must Pass.

That song, titled “Run of the Mill,” dropped subtle hints about his deteriorating relationship with Paul McCartney. “You’ll arrive at your own made end with no one but you to be offended,” George sang.

On Paul’s side, his Ram album from 1971 zeroed in mostly on John Lennon and Yoko Ono. “Too Many People,” in particular, pissed off John with its measured critique of John’s activism and his relationship with Yoko.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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How can you tell a band is headed toward a breakup? For John Lennon, the warning signs came in 1966, when he and the other members of The Beatles told Paul McCartney they wanted to stop touring.

Considering how much of a disaster Beatles tours had become by then, it wasn’t difficult for Paul to see the point. However, another dark omen came in 1967, when Brian Epstein, the band’s manager, died of a drug overdose. Lennon believed the band was genuinely in trouble at that point.

Nonetheless, the show went on for a little while longer. By 1968, John and Yoko Ono were officially together, and that effectively meant the end to the Lennon-McCartney songwriting team as it had been. But the band still had a chance to survive.

It wasn’t until 1969 that things went past the breaking point once and for all. Within a few years, Paul and John would be trading shots at one other on solo albums.

 

Source: cheatsheet.com

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After being wooed by four mop-haired musicians in matching black turtlenecks harmonizing “Help!” on a television screen, 5-year-old Rob Sheffield became a Beatles mega fan.

“Don’t you know that band broke up?” his parents would ask. “They don’t exist anymore,” his teacher would say. It was the early 1970s, and while they weren’t wrong—The Beatles called it quits in the final months of 1970—they weren’t right, either.

Sheffield had seen them, right there on TV. He heard them with his own ears, on the radio and the vinyl records he played.

Almost five decades later, Sheffield, who has written about music and pop culture for Rolling Stone since 1997 and is a New York Times best-selling author of five books, is still listening to The Beatles.

Source: Erin O'Hare/c-ville.com

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Despite the success of the John Lennon/George Harrison pairing on 1971’s Imagine, the two former Beatles never recorded together again — except for one other time. On March 13, 1973, Lennon, Harrison and Ringo Starr recorded “I’m the Greatest,” a song Lennon started writing in late 1970 but eventually gave to Starr. The tune, the opening track on Starr’s hit 1973 album, Ringo, also features “fifth Beatle” Billy Preston on keyboards, making it tantalizingly close to a late-era Beatles song (Preston played on the Beatles’ final albums, Abbey Road and Let It Be).

Source: guitarworld.com

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When you read about The Beatles from 1967 on, you understand why the band split up a few years later. They had already stopped touring, so the main focus was on recording and matters like starting the Apple record label. In other words, they were mostly business partners by the end.

As of ’68, John Lennon had divorced his wife Cynthia and taken up with Yoko Ono full-time. In fact, John began bringing Yoko into recording sessions, something that bothered George Harrison and Ringo Starr while positively irritating Paul McCartney.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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There’s an argument to be made that, at least early on, George Harrison was a bigger deal outside of the Beatles than he was when he was still in the band. That seems absurd, of course, since the Beatles were a one-time-only cultural phenomenon. Nothing before them was as big as they were, and nothing after them ever will be. But within the Beatles, Harrison was the Quiet One, the one always destined to be overshadowed. Throughout the band’s life, he’d made subtle musical choices to nudge the Beatles in certain directions. But he was just starting to write songs when the band was ending — or, at least, he was just starting to convince the other Beatles to record his songs — though he got a few great ones in there before the light finally blinked out. He simply hadn’t commanded the spotlight the way John Lennon and Paul McCartney had.

Source: Tom Breihan/stereogum.com

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