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When they arrived America and made their historic appearance on Ed Sullivan, The Beatles were quite young. Ringo, the elder of the group, checked in at 23 years old. Meanwhile, George Harrison, the youngest, hadn’t even turned 21.

So when the smiling lads performed “I Want to Hold Your Hand,” it sounded like exactly the sort of song they’d write. (It shot to No. 1 not long before they landed at JFK.) But things would change by mid-decade.

A little over two years later, the Fab Four recorded an album featuring backwards tape loops, a guitar solo in reverse, and sound effects that seemed to be seagulls. The LP ended with John Lennon vocals that sounded “like the Dalai Lama chanting from a mountaintop.”

On that track (“Tomorrow Never Knows”), John kicked things off with a line from Timothy Leary’s Psychedelic Experience. Looking back, he wasn’t exaggerating when he called that classic record “the acid album.”

Source: cheatsheet.com

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Fans of Richard Curtis’ rom-coms (and based on his box office numbers there must be tens of millions) will find in "Yesterday" many of the pleasures that drew them to "Four Weddings and a Funeral," "Notting Hill," "Love, Actually" and "Bridget Jones’s Diary." This film, however, has a fantasy dimension that the others did not. An unsuccessful singer-composer, Jack Malik, awakens from a bicycle accident into a world in which the Beatles never existed. Their catalog of songs is gone, and after a moment of moral hesitation, Jack resolves to present them as his own. In "Yesterday"’s universe, these quintessential 1960s songs are as popular as they were in our universe, and make Jack an overnight star. Some critics have liked "Yesterday," but many were disappointed that the film does not treat its clever premise more seriously — or that the film squanders the opportunity to explore the meaning of the Beatles' music today.

Source: salon.com

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What did it take for The Beatles to make a masterpiece? It depended on the song and situation. With the epic “A Day in the Life,” John Lennon came in with the idea, Paul McCartney contributed his part, and longtime producer George Martin found a way to realize John’s complete vision.

On the classic “Yesterday,” Paul said the music came to him in a dream. From there, he struggled to find the right lyrics but eventually nailed down one of his signature songs. Again, Martin made the song come to life — and, for the first time, without the participation of the other Beatles.

Other brilliant tracks took innovative recording techniques to make the root of John’s ideas blossom. On one occasion, he asked for his voice to sound “like the Dalai Lama on a mountaintop.” After some scrambling and experimentation, another classic went on record.

But when John came to the studio with “I Am the Walrus,” Martin could not see a masterpiece about to be born. Quite the contrary, in fact — he seemed to hate the song and the controversy it might bring.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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Int he summer of 1963, The Beatles arrive at the BBC Paris Studio in London armed with a very special plan to add their own spin on an Elvis Presley classic.

Recording material with producer Terry Henebery for the eighth edition of the Pop Go The Beatles radio show, the four lads from Liverpool would record ‘I’m Gonna Sit Right Down And Cry (Over You)’, one of three Elvis songs they put to tape that day.

While Ringo Starr has always professed his distaste for drum solos, he would step up to the mark for The Beatle’s rockabilly version of the song which remained unreleased until 1994 when it was included on the Live at the BBC album.

Source: faroutmagazine.co.uk

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When you run through your favorite Beatles songs credited to Lennon-McCartney, you’ll find a bunch written by either John or Paul (i.e., not both). “Yesterday,” Paul’s masterpiece, came to him in his sleep and went on record without any other Beatles backing him.

If you’re a fan of the 1969 romp “The Ballad of John and Yoko,” that one obviously came straight from John. Then there were tracks like “Come Together,” which began as a pure Lennon composition but got an assist from Paul and the gang in the studio.

As for late-era Beatles songs worthy of the Lennon-McCartney tag, Sgt. Pepper’s is the place to go. On that album, both Paul and John were energized and working together on most of the songs. That includes the classic “A Day in the Life.”

For those who want to isolate what is the best Beatles song of all and a true collaboration between the great songwriters, the closing track from Sgt. Pepper’s just about checks every box.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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John Lennon Official revealed that this photograph taken during the recording sessions for The Beatles (The White Album) at Abbey Road. They also revealed the short story of how and when Jonh Lennon felt guilty to Yoko Ono.

Here is the story:

“GLASS ONION, 1968⠀

“That’s me, just doing a throwaway song, you know, à-la-‘Walrus’, à-la-everything-I’ve-ever-written.

I’m throwing the line in ‘the Walrus was Paul’ there, just to confuse everybody a bit more and because I felt slightly guilty because I’d got Yoko and he’d got nothing and I was going to quit. And so I thought ‘Walrus’ has now got to be me, meaning ‘I am the one’.

Only it didn’t mean that in the song. The reason is, it could’ve been ‘I’m the fox terrier’, you know? I mean, it’s just a bit of poetry. So it was just thrown in like that.”⠀

Source: Enes K./metalheadzone.com

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The State Farm Center, located at 1800 S. First St. in Champaign, will be home to performance of Ringo Starr and His All-Starr Band on August 20.

The former drummer of The Beatles Ringo Starr will be performing with his band at the State Farm Center on Aug. 20.

Ringo Starr and His All-Starr Band will make a stop in Champaign as part of a 2019 tour which marks the band’s 30th anniversary. The band played their first show at the Park Central Amphitheatre in Dallas, Texas, in 1989.

The rock band announced the North American expansion of its 2019 tour back in January. The band performed nine concerts in Japan earlier this year.

Starr is the only constant member of the band, with the rest of the lineup shifting. Twelve variations of the band have toured, according to the music website Discogs.

Source: Eunice Alpasan/dailyillini.com

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While every Beatles show after 1963 was something of a circus, nothing compared to the band’s ’66 tour. By then, the Fab Four were so popular they were traveling around in the back of an armored van. And it turned out they needed that level of protection.

After a violent scene at the airport in the Philippines and threats from the Ku Klux Klan in America’s South, the band’s security detail more than had their hands full. Meanwhile, the quality of a Beatles live performance had plummeted. In the words of John Lennon, it was “a freak show.”

Ringo couldn’t hear the other three playing (and vice versa). And it’s doubtful fans could hear any music above the screaming girls. Practically speaking, a Beatles tour had become impossible.

However, that wasn’t the only reason the band gave up on playing in front of fans. Beginning with the Revolver album, the music itself represented a real challenge when it came to live performances.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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When Beatles fans got their hands on Revolver (1966), they found what many considered a pleasant surprise: three songs by George Harrison. On top of the blistering “Taxman,” George delivered the sitar-infused “Love You To” and the grooving “I Want to Tell You.”

Meanwhile, he’d worked his tail off to get a backwards guitar solo down for John Lennon’s “I’m Only Sleeping.” In fact, George obsessed so much over that track he drove the studio engineers crazy. All in all, you could call it a creative peak for him to that point.

After the band finished Revolver and embarked on its final, maddening tour, the Beatles took a much-deserved holiday. George, along with his wife Pattie, headed off to India for six weeks.

Not long after their return, the band began the nearly five months of work on what became Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. But this time around, fans only got one George Harrison song/. It marked one of his low points with The Beatles.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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Over the years, Paul McCartney added the occasional odd lyric to his Beatles songs. In “Maxwell’s Silver Hammer,” a song his bandmates genuinely hated, Paul sang about the character Joan studying “pataphysical.” That was a reference to the work of French writer Alfred Jarry and pataphysics.

In “Penny Lane,” the classic song from Magical Mystery Tour, Paul sang about “finger pie.” He said that raunchy lyric was slipped in for the guys of Liverpool to enjoy. (A “four of fish” was apparently a reference to the local cuisine and its prices.)

Many listeners misheard the “finger pie” line (and would have missed the reference anyway). However, another line in “Penny Lane” ended up being misquoted countless times since the track’s 1967 release.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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Beatles Radio Listener Poll
Will you see Paul or Ringo Live in 2019