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George Harrison said it was complicated to see his former bandmate, Paul McCartney perform in 1989. The ex-Beatles didn’t have the best relationship before and after they went their separate ways following the band’s split in 1970.

In 1988 George had some conflicting thoughts on Paul. He said they were tentatively rebuilding their relationship during an interview on Aspel & Co.

“I didn’t really know Paul and never really saw much of him through the last 10 or 12 years,” George explained. “But more recently, we’ve been hanging out and getting to know each other, going for dinner and meeting and having a laugh.”

He told Ray Martin (per George Harrison on George Harrison), “Paul is a hypocrite sometimes because right before we had that Hall of Fame thing, you know, we’d not been friends for a number of years and we spent a long time really getting to know each other again, and it was so sad really that Paul should use an old business kind of thing and superimpose it on that situation with the Hall of Fame.”

Source: cheatsheet.com

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George Harrison is one of the songwriters behind “Here Comes the Sun” by The Beatles. Later, this artist offered a glimpse into his creative process, even revealing that he wrote a guitar solo for this original track.

They’re the rock band behind “Let It Be,” “Twist and Shout,” “I Want to Hold Your Hand,” and “In My Life.” Along with Paul McCartney, John Lennon, and Ringo Starr, Harrison was a member of The Beatles.

Although John Lennon and Paul McCartney are credited as songwriters on most Beatles songs, Harrison and Ringo Starr created their originals for the group. For Ringo Starr, that meant “Octopus’s Garden.” For Harrison, that meant “Here Comes the Sun.”

Source: cheatsheet.com

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John Lennon revealed The Beatles’ “In My Life” was originally connected to Penny Lane in Liverpool. John didn’t like the original version of the song. The song was a minor hit in the United Kingdom

John Lennon said the original version of The Beatles‘ “In My Life” had connections to the band’s later song “Strawberry Fields Forever.” He revealed he wasn’t a fan of that draft of the song. In addition, John explained Paul McCartney’s role in writing “In My Life.”The book All We Are Saying: The Last Major Interview with John Lennon and Yoko Ono is an interview from 1980. During the interview, John discussed “In My Life.” “‘In My Life’ started out as a bus journey from my house on 250 Menlove Avenue to town, mentioning every place that I could remember,” he said. “And it was ridiculous.”

Source: cheatsheet.com

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Ringo Starr, 82, displays his snazzy sense of style in a colourful printed shirt and a matching bandana while shopping with his wife Barbara Bach. He recently celebrated his 82nd birthday with his annual Peace and Love bash.

And Ringo Starr continued to display his snazzy sense of style as he enjoyed a spot of retail therapy with his wife Barbara Bach in Malibu on Tuesday.

The Beatles legend donned a colourful printed shirt and a matching bandana as he joined his former Bond Girl spouse, 74, for the shopping trip.

Source: Laura Fox/dailymail.co.uk

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George Harrison had some brutal words about John Lennon’s murderer, Mark David Chapman.

A dreadful phone call woke George and his wife, Olivia, up one night in December 1980. On the other end of the line, someone explained that Chapman had killed George’s fellow Beatle in cold blood in front of his New York City apartment building, the Dakota.

George couldn’t get over what a waste the situation was.

“The call came through sometime in the morning, four or five in the morning,” George said. “I didn’t take the call. Olivia took the call, and she said, ‘John’s been shot.’ And I thought, ‘Oh, how bad is it?’ I just thought maybe a flesh wound or something like that, but she said, ‘No, that’s it, he’s dead.’

“I just went back to sleep, actually. Maybe it was just a way of getting away from it. I just went to sleep and waited to see what it said the next morning, and he was still dead the next morning, unfortunately.”

Source: cheatsheet.c details

What happened when John Lennon showed up at WNEW-FM and broadcast for two hours – a show that's still talked about nearly 50 years later

If you were tuned into New York's WNEW-FM on the afternoon of September 28, 1974, you would've heard a whimsical take on the weather forecast, read by a familiar voice with a Liverpool accent.

“Mostly cloudy with periods,” John Lennon began, pausing a beat. “Of rain this afternoon, tonight and tomorrow. High times - oh no, wish it was. High this afternoon and tomorrow in the 70s, low tonight in the mid-60s. Monday’s outlook, fair and cool, man.”

Source: Classic Rock

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A prized set of Beatles’ autographs from their famous Royal Variety Performance appearance will go on sale later this month.

The night is best remembered for when John Lennon said to the crowd ahead of the group’s last song: “For our last number I’d like to ask your help. To the people in the cheaper seats clap your hands, and the rest of you, if you’d just rattle your jewellery.”

The remark brought peals of laughter, but it was also a special evening for Fiona James, whose father, actor Gerald James, also performed for the Queen Mother on November 4 1963.

She wanted the signatures of the Fab Four, and the moment her father passed a pen to John Lennon was captured on camera, with fellow band member Ringo Starr in the foreground.

Source: Kim Pilling/independent.co.uk

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George Harrison initially started writing one of The Traveling Wilburys’ hit songs, “End of the Line,” like a Bob Dylan song. The former Beatle thought of his bandmate’s music a lot.

In a 1988 joint interview for MTV (per George Harrison on George Harrison: Interviews and Encounters) with his fellow Traveling Wilburys, Tom Petty, and Jeff Lynne, George explained how he wrote the band’s song “End of the Line.”

The interviewer pointed out, “There’s all these questions about who wrote what on the album, and you can kind of tell because who’s singing, but everybody is singing this song.”

Petty added, “You can’t tell, they’re all wrong.” George said, “… some of them we said, ‘OK, we need somebody to sing this one; why don’t you do it, because it suited you.’ So you can’t really tell.”

Source: cheatsheet.com

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On August 8, 1969, on a street in north-west London and almost directly outside a celebrated recording studio, one of the most famous ever album covers was shot. Photographer Iain MacMillan took the image that would adorn the cover of the brilliant new record named after the street where he stood, Abbey Road. The zebra crossing, almost exactly in front of the studio where The Beatles had created the vast majority of their body of work, was about to become one of the most recognized sites in London.

Source: Paul Sexton

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As Oasis exploded into the mainstream comparisons were naturally made between them and the Fab Four.

Because they were a young British band hailing from a northern city (Manchester), the press figured this could be the second coming of The Beatles. But Harrison disagreed. He said of Oasis: "The music lacks depth, and the singer Liam [Gallagher] is a pain, the rest of the band don’t need him."

And McCartney agreed with the star. He said: "They’re derivative and they think too much of themselves. They mean nothing to me."

Things then got worse for Oasis. As if it wasn't bad enough to have two members of The Beatles slamming their band, The Rolling Stones joined in.

Rolling Stones frontman Mick Jagger was quizzed over the most popular band in the country at the time. And he wasn't going to sugarcoat his opinions.

He replied: "You can’t dance to it, the new album’s impossible."
Guitarist Keith Richards had a similar opinion of Oasis. He simply branded the band: "They’re crap."

Source: Callum Crumlish/express.co.uk

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