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The British Invasion began 50 years ago on Friday, Feb. 7, 1964, when the Beatles landed at New York's Kennedy Airport. Two days later, on Sunday, Feb. 9, more than 70 million people watched as John, Paul, George and Ringo rocked the house – and the world – on "The Ed Sullivan Show"

As all musicians, the Beatles were armed with their instruments of choice: Ringo's Oyster Black Ludwig drum kit; George's Gretsch Country Gentleman; Paul's Hofner bass guitar with the strange neck-pocket guitar-strap setup; and, of course, John's black Rickenbacker. On Friday, to mark the 50-year anniversary of the Beatles' performance, The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum put Lennon's beloved guitar on display, on loan directly from Yoko Ono in New York, carried all the way to Cleveland by a dedicated Rock Hall curator. And then it was lovingly installed in a glass case at the Rock Hall. Stop by and take a look. You'll love it – yeah, yeah, yeah! And don't forget, this whole weekend is being dedicated to the Beatles, with Rock Hall programs and events galore. In details

Guitarist participated as part of house band for "The Night That Changed America," premiering Sunday Just six weeks into the new year, Peter Frampton can say he's already had a pretty good 2014.

As if being inducted into the Musicians Hall of Fame in Nashville just after the GRAMMY Awards wasn't enough, Frampton played an integral part in the 50th anniversary celebration of the Beatles' arrival in the U.S. -- which reaches its zenith with Sunday's broadcast of the all-star "The Beatles: The Night That Changed America -- A Grammy Salute" on CBS at 8 p.m. ET. Recruited to perform for, and with, Ringo Starr during the David Lynch Foundation gala on Jan. 20 in Los Angeles, Frampton wound up backing Starr during the GRAMMY Awards ceremony and serving with the house band assembled by Don Was for "The Night That Changed America" taping the next evening. And, the guitarist tells Billboard, spending a week playing Beatles and Beatl details

Fifty years, ago, when Julian Lennon was just a baby, his father, John, and the rest of the Beatles— Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr—packed their bags and boarded a plane headed for the U.S. There, on Feb. 9, 1964, they would grace the stage of “The Ed Sullivan Show,” making them an international music phenomenon.

Growing up, young Julian didn’t understand anything about his father’s massive success and the time that would become known as Beatlemania. “I mean, [during the height of Beatlemania] I was 3, 4, 5 [years old],” Lennon told FOX411. “Anyone must remember that dad left when I was 3 years old. Mom and I lived out of the limelight. We lived a totally different life. “People seem to forget that. In many respects, as much as I’m tied in [with Beatles history] I am also quite distant from it.” Still, on the phone, Lennon sounds exactly as you’d expect him to, with a perfect English accent and a slow, steady tone. In photos, the resemblance between Julian and John is unde details

In 1968, Maurice Hindle sent an ambitious letter to a Beatles fanzine requesting an interview with John Lennon. It was always going to be a long-shot; Hindle was a student at Keele University in Staffordshire County, England, and the Beatles were already the biggest band in the country. You can imagine Hindle’s shock, then, when he received a reply from Lennon himself in December, inviting him and his friends to Lennon’s home in Surrey.

The students made their way to his home, sat on Indian carpets, ate bread and jam prepared by Yoko Ono, and listened to Lennon speak for six hours. The topics ranged from politics to social change (Lennon spent a good deal of time responding to the famous Black Dwarf letter criticizing his anti-uprising stance on “Revolution”), to more practical matters like the Beatles’ upcoming tour. Hard Rock acquired the tapes in 1987, but kept them under wraps until now. But with the 50th anniversary of the Beatles’ first American tour imminent, the company has released them to the p details


WASHINGTON - 
In just a few days, we will mark the 50th anniversary of The Beatles first U.S. concert. The Fab Four played right here in D.C. at the Washington Coliseum. Tommy Roe was as close to the action as anyone. He shared the stage with the legendary group that night as the opening act.

It was 1964. The Beatles -- sensations in England – were making their mark in America. After the band played "The Ed Sullivan Show," Beatlemania tightened its grip on U.S. fans. The band was set to play their first U.S. concert, and it was happening in the nation's capital inside the Washington Coliseum. “It was called the Washington Sports Arena, so it really wasn't set up for a concert series,” said Rebecca Miller, Executive Director of the DC Preservation League. They were playing a concert at a venue that wasn't really a concert venue at all. There wasn't even a details

The modern day's most popular psychedelic surrealists, the Flaming Lips, covered the Sixties' most popular psychedelic song, "Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds," as part of The Late Show With David Letterman's Beatles Week last night. Moreover, they did it with a little help from their friend Sean Lennon.

The Lips had previously shared their own, six-minute audio rendition of the song via frontman Wayne Coyne's Instagram, but, as with every Flaming Lips song, the visual element makes it so much better. On Letterman, Coyne wore a frilly silver coat and stood atop a road case, waving his arms like a born-again prophet, with ribbons colored with pastel pink and green lights flowed from him. Lennon, sporting the same hat and beard his dad wore on the album sleeve for Hey Jude, stood to Coyne's left and swayed as he sang of "cellophane flowers." When the chorus finally hit, so did the glitter, as thousands of tiny silver particles (diamonds?) rained over the musicians and Coyne's ribbon ligh details

A new exhibit at the New York Public Library shows how Beatle mania swept the country when the Fab Four stepped off a plane at JFK and onto the stage of the Ed Sullivan Show. It's hard to believe but Ed Sullivan famously said, "Ladies and gentleman, The Beatles" a half century ago. They're also the name of a new exhibit at the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts. It was organized by the Grammy museum to show the impact of the Beatles on American culture.

"It's a trip back for some people back in time 50 years ago when they were teenagers but it's also meant to show teenagers today how the Beatles continue to impact us because they do," says The Grammy Museum Executive Director Bob Santelli. "You can really learn a lot here and you can just remember and you can remember how wonderful it was for yourself," says New York Public Library for the Performing Arts Executive Director Jaqueline Davis. And for fans who thinks they've seen it all? "They didn't. Because what we did for this exhibit was find a photographer who has never befo details

Of course there were the thousands of screaming teenage girls who loved them — yeah, yeah, yeah. But when the four Beatles first landed in New York in early February 1964 — here for “The Ed Sullivan Show” and a few other performances — they each got some more personal attention from some ladies.

John Lennon was traveling with his then-wife, Cynthia. Paul McCartney had the company of Jane Asher. And Ringo Starr seemed to meet a pretty young dancer during a night out at one of New York City’s hottest clubs, the Peppermint Lounge. George Harrison? Just a couple weeks shy of his 21st birthday, he had his older sister, Louise, along. And, as it turned out, he was lucky he did. The band had just been in Paris, prior to flying to New York from England, and when they got in, Louise tells The Post, “George had a temperature of 104 degrees and a really, really bad strep throat.” The house doctor at the Plaza, where The Beatles were staying, was consulted and, recalls Louise, he said: “We need to put this guy in the hospital. He&r details

A section of stage wall from the Beatles' February 9, 1964 appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show is valued at $800,000-1m ahead of a sale at Heritage Auctions in Dallas on April 26.

The band's appearance on the show marked their introduction to American audiences and the response was frenzied. The 16 x 48 inch fibreglass piece was signed by all four members prior to the show, with each drawing a caricature of themselves next to their autograph, and was later presented to a young fan. Garry Shrum, consignment director of music memorabilia at Heritage Auctions, is left in no doubt as to the significance of the piece, commenting: "There is no more important band in rock and roll than The Beatles and there was no moment more important in solidifying their worldwide popularity than the moment they played Ed Sullivan on Feb. 9, 1964. "Now, almost 50 years to the day since it was signed, this piece has emerged from private hands and is looking to take its rightful place as the single-most important piece of Beatles memorabilia in existence. "Holy details

If it hadn’t been for Johnny Depp, Paul McCartney might never have won a Grammy for Best Rock Song with the surviving members of Nirvana. That’s precisely what happened a little over a week ago at the 56th Annual Grammy Awards, when the former Beatle ended up onstage with Dave Grohl, Krist Novoselic and Pat Smear to accept the hardware for their collaboration, “Cut Me Some Slack.”

“I blame Johnny Depp,” McCartney explained to a group of reporters gathered at the Staples Center’s media room. “Because he’d just given me this little cigar box guitar, which I was wildly excited about, so I took it along [to the studio].” McCartney’s instrument selection wasn’t the only aspect of the recording session that traces back to the film industry. The idea for the entire collaboration grew out of Sound City, a 2013 documentary on the California recording studio of the same name. Sound City Studios, founded in 1969 and shuttered in 2011, was played host to some of the top musical acts details

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