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The Beatles stopped performing live concerts in August 1966 and focused instead on the latter half of their studio albums with more experimental music. But then on January 30, 1969, the Fab Four gave an unannounced show on the rooftop of Apple Corps headquarters at 3 Savile Row; their final Iive performance together. In a new post on The Beatles’ official Instagram account, Sir Ringo Starr reflected on the incredible occasion.

The Beatles drummer said: “We hadn’t been seen playing live in a long while.

“Only the crew were there and some people on the rooftop.

“But I’ve always liked the idea that maybe half a million people would have come to see us if they could have got there.”

However, in the end, the band’s final live show was shut down due to noise complaints.

Source: George Simpson/express.co.uk

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As The Music Network reports, The Beatles played a sold-out show at Melbourne’s Festival Hall back in 1964, performing tracks including ‘She Loves You’, ‘I Saw Her Standing There’, ‘Twist and Shout’, ‘Can’t Buy Me Love’ and ‘Long Tall Sally’. While John Lennon, Paul McCartney and George Harrison were all there, the band relied on the services of stand-in drummer Jimmie Nicol during the concert. All up, the group played 13 shows across Australia.

Nine will be airing the full concert, titled One Night Only – The Beatles in Oz, on Monday (July 13) at 9:30pm AEST. It will also be available to stream on 9Now. The concert will be remastered and will include never-before-seen footage.

Source: nme.com

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When fans and critics start ranking all the albums by The Beatles, you usually find Let It Be (1970) near the bottom. That makes sense for a number of reasons. For starters, the last Beatles release wasn’t a product of all four band members working together in the studio.

In early ’70, after the band handed the tapes over to producer Phil Spector, Paul McCartney was barely speaking with the other three Beatles. And when he heard Spector’s rendition of “The Long and Winding Road” Paul became irate (to put it mildly).

Meanwhile, John Lennon didn’t play on “I Me Mine,” the last track The Beatles recorded in a studio as a band. And, speaking of George Harrison songs, you have to wonder how George only had “For You Blue” and “I Me Mine” on there, what with all the songs he had stashed in his notebook.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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Linda McCartney was Paul McCartney's first wife and her tragic death left the legend in shambles. Here are some facts not many know about the female artist.

Paul and Linda McCartney's love was one that involved creativity and adventure. The two wed in 1969 and remained married until Linda's untimely death in 1998.

During her lifetime, Linda was heavily involved not only in her husband's music but in her own projects with photography and writing. 11 interesting facts about her are found below.

HER PHOTOS WERE WELL-RENOWNED

Linda wasn't just a backup singer for her husband. A year before the pair got married, she took a picture of Neil Young which would become the cover for his 2008 album, "Sugar Mountain: Live at Canterbury House."

Source: Jaimie-lee Prince/news.amomama.com

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Ringo Starr, the drummer for the British rock band The Beatles, is celebrating his 80th birthday today.

Because of the coronavirus pandemic, according to BBC, Starr will forgo his annual birthday gathering and instead perform a concert on YouTube at 8 p.m. ET today.

“... He will put on a virtual charity concert on YouTube called Ringo’s Big Birthday Show. He’ll be joined by Sir Paul McCartney, Joe Walsh, Ben Harper, Sheryl Crow, Gary Clark Jr. and Sheila E to benefit Black Lives Matter, The David Lynch Foundation, MusiCares and WaterAid,” reported the BBC.

Starr was the last to join The Beatles. The group was formed in 1960 in Liverpool with Paul McCartney, John Lennon, George Harrison and drummer Pete Best. Starr joined as the drummer in 1962.

Source: Deb Kiner/pennlive.com

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The Beatles had a fifth unofficial member in the form of their producer, Sir George Martin. He was more than a producer as he served as a friend and a father figure to the four members.

We often celebrate and note the musical contributions made by The Beatles, but Martin was the oil that kept their machine going. To honor him we look at 11 facts about the producer whom George Harrison described as “always there for us to interpret our strangeness.”

1. On September 4, 1962, John Lennon and Paul McCartney first played "Please Please Me" for Martin during their second EMI recording session. The song was originally a slow tempo until the producer suggested they speed it up and it became a hit.

MARTIN’S CONTRIBUTIONS IN 1965

2. In 1965, McCartney finished writing “Yesterday” but the band couldn’t decide on the instruments that should go with the song. Martin came to the rescue when he suggested McCartney plays an acoustic guitar and sing the track by himself.

Source: Junie Sihlangu/news.amomama.com

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As the pandemic continues across the world, politicians and celebrities are encouraging the public to wear face masks. Now The Beatles drummer Sir Ringo Starr has joined in by sharing the Abbey Road album cover, but with a few changes. The 79-year-old wrote: “Peace and love everybody stay safe be cool. Be kind and loving peace -and love love.”

While the Abbey Road meme saw John Lennon turning around on the Abbey Road zebra crossing and walking back to the studio.

George Harrison asks him: “What happened?”

To which John Lennon replies: “I forgot my mask…”

Source: George Simpson/express.co.uk

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The New York City neighborhood in which John Lennon called home for years has many iconic locations that serve to remind us of his legacy there. His wife, Yoko Ono, continues to live at The Dakota apartment building at the corner of Central Park West and W. 72 St. that the couple shared for years.

Directly across the street in Central Park are both Strawberry Fields and the lovely Imagine mosaic.
Add another to the list, albeit temporarily. Carmen Paulino, who calls herself a community artist, has wrapped a tree on 79th Street, between Broadway and Amsterdam Ave., with a crocheted artwork she calls the John Lennon Tree. The elaborate installation went up in June and is the handiwork of Paulino, herself a local from Spanish Harlem, with the assistance of several others. It’s conveniently located in front of a yarn store named Knitty City, which provided Paulino with the materials.

Source: bestclassicbands.com

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In early 1970, with The Beatles on the verge of breaking up, Ringo Starr paid a visit to Paul McCartney’s house with a request from his three bandmates at Apple headquarters. Would Paul delay the release of his debut solo record until after the arrival of the Let It Be album and film?

In brief, Paul’s reply to Ringo was, “No.” But it didn’t stop there. In addition to his flat rejection of Ringo’s request, Paul threw Ringo off of his property and threatened to “finish” him. Needless to say, Ringo and Paul wouldn’t be having tea and cutting records together anytime soon.

However, Ringo did maintain solid relationships with John Lennon and George Harrison. On John’s heavyweight 1970 solo debut, you’ll find Ringo in the drummer’s seat. That same year, you found Ringo playing on tracks for George’s triple-disc blockbuster, All Things Must Pass.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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A few years after their breakup, The Beatles were offered a ridiculous sum of money for a one-time reunion concert, but turned it town because the opening act would have featured a shark.

That’s what Ringo Starr is revealing in a new interview with the Sunday Mirror, discussing a “crazy offer” he and the other members of the Fab Four received in 1976.

According to a report from People at the time, the four were offered $50 million by impresario Bill Sargent, a pioneer in pay-per-view events, to reunite for a concert.

RELATED: ‘The Beatles: Get Back’ Documentary Restores Iconic Rooftop Concert

“We did talk one time. There was a crazy offer out there,” Starr explained.

According to Starr, the group ultimately decided against it because of the opening act that Sargent had in mind: a man fighting a great white shark.

Source: Brent Furdyk/etcanada.com

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